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" IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. --

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In the House of Commons, on Wednesday, Mr. Blake moved the second reading of the Municipal Corporations (Ireland) Act Amendment Bill, the object of which is to change the oath taken by Roman Catholic members of cor- porations into a simple declaration, and to give the same power with regard to the choice of sheriffs to Irish as is possessed by English corporations. Sir R. Peel opposed the bill. The bill was withdrawn. Sir C. O'Loghlen moved the second reading of the Bank Notes (Ireland) Bill, which after a brief discussion was withdrawn.. Mr. Lygon moved the second reading of the Educational and Charitable Institutions Bill, the object of which is to provide places ot worship for public schools within them- selves, and to apply the same system to charitable institu- tions and alms-houses, instead of having them, as now, under the spiritual jurisdiction of the incumbents of parishes, and forming part of the congregations of the parish churches, the officiating chaplains being responsible to the bishop of the diocese only. Mr. R. Mills moved the rejection of the bill, objecting to its principle, which was to bring all the masters of public schools under the control of the bishops, thus neutralising the power of the trustees, while it would operate to compel Nonconformist students to attend services of the Established Church; besides which many, if not most of the schools to which it would apply were insufficient to make adequate congregations. Mr. Walter said that the bill applied only to Church of England schools, and the intention was to enable provision to be made forjDivine service in such schools independently of the interference of the incumbents of parishes. Mr. Hadfield having spoken against, and Mr. W. E. Foster in favour of the principle, Sir G Grey said that if the .grievance whieh had been stated existed, the principle was one which he should be willing to accept, but he had never heard of any undue in- terference by incumbents with services in the chapels of SCOn°iSdivision the second reading was carried by 49 to 35; and it was, on the motion of Mr. Lygon, ordered to be com- raitted that day three months On going into committee on the Railway Clauses Bill, Mr. Bass moved its rejection, complaining that clauses which had given protection to persons in the metropolis whose property was to be taken by railway companies had been struck out. An animated debate ensued, which ran chiefly against the. bl}*» aQd Mr. Gibson eventually withdrew it. -the Parsonages Bill was read a third time and passed, as were the National Gallery (Dublin) Bill, the Harwich Har- The Parsonages Bill was read a third time and passed, as were the National Gallery (Dublin) Bill, the Harwich Har- bour Bill, the Carriers Act Amendment Bill, the Salmon Fishery Act (1861) Amendment Bill, the Falmouth Borough Bill, and the Peace Preservation (Ireland) Bill. The Ap- Pr-Tia^n Bl,U ^aa brought in. „ d oiirned r 8111003 was gone through, and the House

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SHE NEVER TOLD HER LOVE.

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RATHER ELEVATED.I

SINGULAR ACTION FOR FALSE…

THE ALLEGED HOMICIDE AT STEPNEY.|

Ianh Q1:.aUHttY 'J]jarkds.

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