Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

11 articles on this Page

EPITOME OF NEWS.

[No title]

AGRICULTURE.I

AN ENGLISH ARTIST TAKEN BY…

AN ACTRESS'S CARRIAGE AND…

MARRY IN HASTE, AND REPENT…

News
Cite
Share

MARRY IN HASTE, AND REPENT AT LEISURE. The case of Inglis v. Inglis came before the Judge Ordinary, in the Divorce Court, on Saturday. Mr. T. J. Clark for the petitioner; Mr. Serjeant Robinson and Mr. Inderwick for the respondent. The marriage was in 1860, at which time the peti- tioner was of about twenty years of age. She was the daughter of a civil engineer in the Old Kent-road, and she had a fortune of 51,100 or £ 1,200. She had, however, been in the habit of giving lessons in the French language, and she had made the acquaintance of the respondent, who was a widower twice her age, in consequence of his calling on her to engage her services for his daughter. The marriage was said to have been a secret one, and one ex- tremely distasteful to her friends. Her case was that when she came into the receipt of her property, her husband insisted on investing it in the Shipwrights' Arms, a concert-room at Gravesend. Against this step she had strongly protested, and it had led to quarrels between them, and a virtual separation, the respondent alleging the state of his health as an excuse for his conduct. She now prayed for a judi- cial separation on the ground of his cruelty. She stated that her husband had treated her with neglect and unkindness, compelled her to sleep on the floor, and omitted to supply her with proper clothing and necessaries. She also specified one or two acts of violence, but they were not, on her own showing, of a very aggravated character. The respondent, in reply, stated that he had recently been in delicate health, having formerly been subject to fits, and he altogether denied the allegations of violence. He had once pushed her down, but it was only because she was coming to him in a threaten- ing attitude, and he apprehended violence from her. On another occasion he had found the petitioner and bis daughter pulling each other's hair; but so far from his assaulting the latter, he had merely interfered to part them. Though he was much older than his wife, she had selected him with her eyes open, and the first overtures had come from her (a laugh). He stated also that he had asked and obtained the consent of her father before her marriage; but the father was now in a lunatic asylum. Sir J. Wilde was of opinion that no case of cruelty had been made out for the interposition of the court. The parties, no doubt lived very uncomfortably to- gether, but this court had no power to separate people who could not agree together. The two charges of cruelty advanced by the wife were very trivial cases, and there certainly was no reason why she should be afraid of living with him. He should, therefore, re- fuse the decree.

THE LAW OF MORTMAIN.

THE ASSASSINATION CONSPIRACY.

ASSAULTING A SWEETHEART.

",,¡ JBXTBACTS 3TBOM "FUiSfCH…

[No title]