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I ■! J ARLIAMERTAHY JOTTINGS.…

THE FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT…

1. ! A CURIOUS LIBEL CASE.

FRIGHTFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT…

THE ROYAL MOTTOES OF ENGLAND.I

'--THE WRECK OF THE LEADER.

I HIGHWAY ROBBERY BY A WOMAN.

- WANDSWORTH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION.

EXHIBITION OF VERMIN TRAPS.

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EXHIBITION OF VERMIN TRAPS. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals recently oirered a prize of £40 for a more humane vermm trap, to which invitation no less than 126 competitors have responded by sending in for exhibi- tion and judgment to the Royal Hortioultural Gardens, South Kensington, every possible variety of ingenious devices for 0utwitting mice, rats, stoats, weasels, polecats, grimalkins of the domestic species having their predatory instinct unduly developed, foxes, owls, hawks, and aN other creeping and flying things which dare to gratify tastes, that they have in common with that stupendous monopolist man. Some of the traps are most elaborate pieces of workmanship; others are altogether as primitive in their construc- tion, descending in simplicity to one consisting of a few pieces of cardboard stitched together with a needle and thread. It would be tedious to attempt to recapitulate the variety of gin-traps, dead-fail traps, pit-fall traps, live-bait traps, through-run traps, and self-setting trans, included in the number exhibited. It may be not -at of place to notice a few of the most striking inventions. No. 4., the invention of Mr. Smith, is a most ingenious modification of the pit-fall trap, applicable to animals of all sizes from a mouse to a lion It consists of a balance-weighted Uv? Th^h tke aEiD^l jumps to reach the bait from a solid platform. His weight causes the cage to descend, and on his passing out by a hole in the side into a pen from which he oannot return, the cage rises for the next comer,. A variety of most in- gemous self-setting nionge and rat traps are shown, the best being No. 54, by Mr. Wood; No. 58, Mr. Braddock; and No. 97, Mr. Richardson. The simplest, the cheapest, the most generally applicable, and the most readily made, is an improvement on theoldfigUTeof tour trap, invented by J. Miles, gardenertoC. Woodd, Esq., of Rosslyn-houee, Hampatead. It consists of a box or hurdle, supported by two sticks, which are held together by a slit cut in the side of a twig carrying the bait. Any one could prepare such a trap with a pocket knife in a few minutes. It can be made to catch a 1 mouse or a mastiff dog, to act as a live trap or as a dead fall; it might remain set for months in a "corner without its efficacy becoming impaired from exposure, and is as efficient as it is simple.