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I ■! J ARLIAMERTAHY JOTTINGS.…

THE FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT…

1. ! A CURIOUS LIBEL CASE.

FRIGHTFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT…

THE ROYAL MOTTOES OF ENGLAND.I

'--THE WRECK OF THE LEADER.

I HIGHWAY ROBBERY BY A WOMAN.

- WANDSWORTH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION.

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WANDSWORTH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION. The working people of Wandsworth, emulating the example set them by North, South, East, and West London, have succeeded in establishing an Industrial Exhibition of their own of a highly creditable cha- racter. The history of the local effort which produced the gratifying spectacle which we witnessedlast Fri- day at the Assembly-rooms, Spread Eagle, Wands- worth, where the exhibition is being held, is interest- ing and somewhat instructive. To the efforts of the Wandsworth Working Men's Institute are due the credit of the exhibition which on that day was opened to the public. Its conception and carrying out have, we understand, been entirely due to the working men of the district, twenty-one of whom, in the first instance, paid down 21 each as aguarantee that no loss should ensue, which sum was afterwards enlarged by contributions from the neighbouring gentry. The exhibitors number 150, and the space occupied is 1,100 feet of wall and 500 feet of table and Soor, exclusive of objects of art lent for ex- hibition. The districts of ifalham, Chelsea, Wimble- don, Boehampton, Clapham, Tooting, Battereea, Put- ney, and Merton are represented, and the articles sent from these various districts are so numerous that the spacious apartment in which they are arranged is al- most incapable to display them to advantage. Articles of the highest merit as regards industry and ingenuity, but few of a utilitarian character, have been con- tributed. In the artistic department are to be found the schoolmaster, school-boys, book- binders, porters, warehousemen, letter-sorters, wood carvers, coachmakers, clerks, carpenters, engi- neers, plasterers, metal-planers, house painters, masons, pattern-makers, table-cover painters, deco- rators, photographers, labourers, bricklayers, wood- engravers, hatters, and others. Bricklayers, ushers, stonemasons, grooms, gardeners, coachmakers, dyers, labourers, boot salesmen, millwrights, an officer of the Clapham Branch for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, shoemakers, coachmen, carpenters, clerks, boat- builders, weavers, engineers, watchmakers, schoolboys, scalemakers, booksellers, greasepressers, coach-body- | makers, metalplaners, and sawyers figure in the mechanical department. In the general and fabrics and fancy departments almost all sorts of trades are represented, and some of the contributions of the exhibitors are most amusingly foreign to the particular callings of the respec- tive inventors and manufacturers: for instance, a bricklayer's labourer exhibits two violins, his own workmanship. Amongst objects of interest sent for exhibition is the magnificent piece of carving belonging to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, consisting of 4,000 figures, representing the human race, which attracted so much attention in the South London Exhibition in 1864; also a model of a ship made by the French prisoners at Portsmouth during the last war, from the bones remaining from their food. The opening ceremony on Friday was witnessed by a large number of persons. The Earl of Shaftesbury presided, and amongst those present were the Rev. Messrs. D'Arcy, Irvine, Gendus, Gore, and Hales; Messrs. Barton, Wilson, Martin, King, Greensheet, Walters, Makrell, Logstaff, M.D., Few, Ganard, S. H. Goss, G. F. White (president), and W. B. Lrafield, jun. (secretary to the club). Mr. G. F. White and Mr. Linfield, jun., having given a brief sketch of the efforts which had edl-i- nated in the gratifying spectacle that day presented, and testified to the benefit to be derived from working men's elates, The Earl of Shaftesbury addressed the audience at some length, and concluded by formally declaring the exhibition open. On the motion of Dr. Longataff, a vote of thanks was cordially passed to the Earl of Shaftesbury for presiding. An inspection of the contents of the exhibition then took place, and the good taste, originality of genius and untiring industry evidenced by many of the con- tributor.3 received due praise. It should be mentioned that the hall was' tastefully decorated for the occasion and that the band of the Wandsworth Police lri-ndlv lent by the superintendent, Mr. Butt, rendered good assistance in the way of some very agreeable selections of music. The exhibition, it is expected, will remain open for a fortnight or three weeks. It is certainly deservmg of every succe.s, and such, it is hoped, will be the result.

EXHIBITION OF VERMIN TRAPS.