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I ■! J ARLIAMERTAHY JOTTINGS.…

THE FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT…

1. ! A CURIOUS LIBEL CASE.

FRIGHTFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT…

THE ROYAL MOTTOES OF ENGLAND.I

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THE ROYAL MOTTOES OF ENGLAND. The following are the Royal mottoes of England. (1) Die-u et inoit, Droit (God and my Right). These words were the parole of the day in the armv of Richard I., at the battle of Gisors, in France (1198) As the French were signally defeated, the Lion Kin adopted the parole as the Royal motto of England (2) Ieh Dien (I serve) was the motto under the plume of ostrich feathers found in the helmet of the Bohemian king, slain by the Blank Prince at the famous battle of Creasy (1346). Edward the Black Prince adopted the plume and motto. His father Edward III., commanded, and although the victory was due to the son, he modestly chose to say, I serve" under the king, my father. (3) Honi soit qui mal y pense (Evil be to him, who thinks evil of this). It is said that while Edward III. was contemplating the formation of an order of knights, somewhat similar to that of the Round Table, he happened to give a court ball (1348). Amongst the ladies present was the beautiful Countess of Salisbury, whose garter of blue ribbon accidentally fell off. The king saw a significant smile among the bystanders, and gallantly came to the rescue. "Honi soi qui mal y pense" (Shame to him who thinks shame of this occurrence), eried the king. Then, binding the ribbon round his own knee, he added, "I will bring It to pass that the proudest noble in the land shall think it an honour to wear this band." The incident determined the king to abandon his previous plan of the Round Table, and to form, instead, the Order of the Garter. This tale is given by Tighe and Davis, in their Annals of Windsor," and was taken from Polydore Virgil, who lived in the reign of Henry VII. Much has been written to pooh-pooh it, and amongst others, Dr. Doran has attempted to give another version by tracing the Order to that of the Blue Thong," which he says was instituted by the Lion King, when he started for Acre; but the doctor has not given us his authority for this assertion, and for our own part we think the old tradition quite in character with the chivalric spirit of the Middle w £ en ey0ry knight thought it his bounden duty and highest honour to wear, as his badge, the favour of some lady. (4) Je maintiendrai (I will maintain) was the motto of the House of Nassau. When William III. came to England he continued to use the same motto, but added to it these words, the liberties of England and the Protestant Religion." This motto was only personal, for the king, very wisely, commanded that the old motto of Dieu et ncit Droit, should still be retained on the Great Seal (1688). Thp, SchooL of Self Culture," in Cassell's Illustrated Family Paper.

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