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I ■! J ARLIAMERTAHY JOTTINGS.…

THE FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT…

1. ! A CURIOUS LIBEL CASE.

FRIGHTFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT…

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FRIGHTFUL COLLIERY ACCIDENT IN M0NM0UTH8BIRE. Loss of Twenty-six Lives. One of the most lamentable and frightful colliery explosions that has ever happened in South Wales took place &t the New Bedwelty pit, the property of the Tredegar Company, on Friday morning. The men went down as usual that morning, and everything ap- peared to go on right until about half-past ten o'clock, when the gas fired. Fortunately the explosion did not reach the bottom of the shaft, and in consequence no time was lost in examining the colliery in order to ascertain the results of the explosion. Mr. Bevan, the manager, and the other officials were immediately on the spot, and gangs or relays were formed for the pur- pose of exploring the workings. It was pretty clearly ascertained that the gas had fired in what was termed the back workings, where 46 men and boys were at work. Some 10 or 12 were got out in an almost dying state from the effects of choke damp, but through the exertions of the medical men on the surface they all recovered. The first body was brought up in about three- quarters of an hour, and as corpse after corpse was landed on the bank, the scenes were of the most heart- rending description. In one case a father and two sons were killed, in another two brothers, and in a third a father and son. Out of 26 killed, 11 were married, several leaving large families. The company, it is believed, will provide for the sufferers, so that there will be no necessity for a public subscription. Mr. Lionel Brough, the Government inspector for the district, arrived on Saturday morning, and, in company with M. Bevan, immediately descended to the colliery, and they were down for a considerable time. The government inspector made as minute an examination as was possible under the circumstances, and the result of his inspection will be made known at the inquest. From authentic information received from the officials and workmen, it appears that there were over 200 hands employed in the colliery. On Friday morn- ing the fireman discovered gas in a cross heading in the back workings, where a man named David Jones and his son worked. The danger signal was put up, but it was feared that this was disregarded, for there Is every appearance that the explosion took plaeo in Jones's working place. The colliery is worked entirely by naked lights,, but Jozies had been provided with a safety-lamp, as "an ext-m precaution, as a little gaa had been observed before^ in his stall. 46 were employed in that sectssn colliery, and out of that number 20 escaped.. the system of splitting the air was adopted, by which every section of the colliery had a free course of air. Had it been otherwise it is very probable that the explosion would have extended throughout the whole of the workings, where some 200 more hands were employed. The separate current oo Am to the back workings was computed to be ^0,000 cubic feet per minute, the ventilation being by furnace. inquest was opened on Saturday afternoon, before Dr. W. H. Brewer, coroner, at the Greyhound Inn, Tredegar. After the bodies had been viewed the inquiry was adjourned.

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