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DEATH OF MR. DALLAS.

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DEATH OF MR. DALLAS. American advices by the Mricabring Jhe intelli- gence that Mr. George MiShn Dan^ died in Phila- delphia, his birthplace, on the last day of 1884. Mr. rSEas was one of the moat esteemed of American Satesmen, and by his family connection with.several distinguished men in this country, not less than by SSical sojourn in England as American Minister to the Court of St. James, will he be remembered by Sanyfriends among ns with kindly regret and respect, was called to the American bar in 1813, hut his true bent was for politics, and he commenced his distin. nnhlie career as private secretary to Mr. fallatin, who was charged in 1813 tonegottotethe S-, £ "&S the following Mr_ Ganatin was for this Alexander, to whose conr^' upwardg of flfty S ago Having travelled through Europe, for » short time as Secretary of Legation^in Londor> Mr. Dallas returned to the United iwgauiou i Years' practice of his profession SSftS. whicl city he was subsequently mayor. In 1829 he wa^ap- Domted district attorney of Pennsylvania. In 1831 he Selected to the State Seaate, and six years after- wards was sent by Mr. President Van Buren as United States Minister to the Court of the Czar. This post he filled until the Democratic party felt from power on the election of President Harrison, and then returned to private life and the practice of his profession. But in the ensuing Presidential struggle his name was coupled with that of Mr. Polk as a party-cry, and the Democrats elected him Vice-President of the United States in 1844. In 1856, immediately after the signature of the peace of Paris, which closed the Russian war, a difficulty with the United States and England arose, which seriously threat- ened the peaceful relations of the two governments. The "Mosquito question," and the dispute which had arisen concerning the alleged recruitment of American subjects by Sir John Crampton, the British Minister at Washington, gave rise to much angry and dan- gerous feeling. In this crisis Mr. Dallas was nomi- nated to succeed Mr. BuchanaR at the Court of St. James, and the choice of the American Government was at once accepted in England as an earnest of the character with which negotiations would be invested, and a guarantee for the tone in which they could be met. Peace was preserved, and the ripe experience and natural weight of character of the deceased states- man contributed in a large measure to the conciliatory course which brought about the desirable result. Mr. Dallas was a man of polished intellectual attainments, and of high private character.

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