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AN UNRULY APPRENTICE SENT…

INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITIONS AND…

CHARGE OF CRUELTY TO A HORBE.

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CHARGE OF CRUELTY TO A HORBE. At the County Petty Sessions: hold at the. Assize: Court, Kingston-upon-Thames, Mr. Frederick Taunton, a gas-metior- examiner, in an extensive way of business, and inspector for the corporation of tie town of Kingston, appeared before the-bench to answer the complaint of'the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, which charged him with having: caused a horse to be cruelly ill-treated, abused, andi tortured. Mr. W. Love, from the office of the society, who attended to- conduct the prosecution, made the follow- ing statement t.—The defendant; for the purpose of his business, kept some two or three horses and carts, and" the condition of the horses was so bad aa to become the subject of much comment. among the-inhabitants of the town. At length two of the horses were stopped in the stroots, and the result was that the defendant was mulcted in tha heaviest pecuniary penalty by. the borough magistrates, for sending such hsrses out to work. Subsequently it appeared that the defendant; hired a fieldj in which there was little or no grass, for 5 Is. 6ft perweek, into which he turned three of his horses, was stat to be. as. hor- rible asitis possibleto imagin:e-being the-horsein ques- tion. It-appeared that the same horse fell into a ditch in, the field, and by reason of weakness and exhaustion from previous neglect and starvation, it was unable to extricate itself. At length, the attention of certain individuals was called to it, and it was. got out of, the. ditch, but could not stand. The ground at the time was covered" with snow several inches deep, and it: was excessively cold. The defendant was informed of the state of the- horse at the time, but he refused to attend to-it, and thus the wretched animal lay upon the ground, without food, water, or covering, plunging in agony throughout the whole ofi the night. The? defendant was informed -if it again the following day, but he w-o-aliel not go, nor send to it, and the horse v a- suffered: to remain the same state throughout the, 'whole of that: day (Siaiday), the defendant's wIfe. having told the police tat Sllnday. was not a day to look after horses. On Sunday, at eight o'clock at night, the horse was seen gasping and groaning loudly, lying in the same spot, when it gradually got weaker;. asd at leagth death put an end to its sufferings. Thsde- fendant sent the horse-slaughterer for it on the follow- iag day, and received* 5s. for- its carcase. The body of the animal1 was covered with wounds, and its bones were nearly protruding. Witnesses having been called who deposed to; the above; Mr.. Love attention of the magistrate to the Act of Parliament under which the information was laid, pointing out that clswase which empowers the magistrates to commit offenders forthwith, without giving them the option of paying a pecuniary penalty. He dwelt upon the fact. that the defendant was not a i poor man, but a man of position and education, of | whom it might have been expected that he would have some little feeling of eompassion and regard for the life of his wretched horse, and to whom he re- spectfully submitted any fine under the Act could hardly be considered commensurate with the enormity of his offence. The defendantentereifinto a long statement in de. fence, the gist of whieh was that he was not made aware of the real condition of the horse till it was too late, and that he had been the victim: of dishonest carters, who bad' L-old tl- horses' food and ill-treated them into the bargain, which accounted for their bad appearance. After the magistrates had consulted together, the chairman said that the defendant had been guilty of a most inhuman act of cruelty-an act which it was impossible to condemn too strongly. He was warned that the horse was dying, yet, as though bereft of all feelings of humanity, he left it to its fate. It was a most serious charge. The magistrates felt much in- clined to commit him to prison; They had decided, however, upon giving him another chance. He must pay the full penalty of £ 5, together with £ 115s. costs, or go to prison for two calendar months; and the society had fulfilled a very proper-duty in bringing the defendant before the public. The defendant paid the "fine and costs, remarking that he would now be driven from the town, and must give up horsekeeping- altogether. The court was crowded by the inhabitants of th town, who appeared much interested in the case.

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WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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DUBLIN INTERNA TIONAL EXHIBITION.…

A LITTLE FRENCH CLUB.