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MB. GLADSTONE'S AXE AT CHICAGO.

OBJECTING TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED.I

AN EHRAtfT HUSBAND.

--! PONTYPOOL BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

FASHIONABLE MARRIAGE.

IATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE…

FATAL FALL AT NEWPORT.—

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CITY CORRESPONDENCE. ♦

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CITY CORRESPONDENCE. ♦ BAiLON TON DAUER, the Austrian Minister of War, i has been stating his views with regard to duelling. While not altogether approving it on principle be thinks the present state of society does not permit of the abolition of such encounters, as persons would in that case have recourse to rougher means, such as the fist, the stick, or the revolver. THE Government, iij order to afford full informa. tion upon a much-discussed portion of the Em. ployers' Liability Bill, intends to ask the House of Commons to agree to the issue of a memorandum showing the state of the law as to employers' liabil. ity in relation to shipping interests in the United States, France, Germany, Sweden, and Norway. IT is stated that the German Empress will this year pay a visit to her native place in Schleswig- Solstein. The affair between the family of the Empress and King Christian of Denmark about the inheritance left by Duohess Wilhelmina of Clucksi- burg has now beeg definitely settled. A part cf the treasure has been handed over to the Danish King, while Glacksburg Castle has passed over to the Empress's brother-in-law, Prince Ferdinand of Schleawig-Holstien-Glnckeburg. IT is rep orted in official circles that Sir Anthony Maedonnell will succeed Sir Charles Elliott us Lieutenant.Governor of Bengal, an appointment Sir Charles has held since October, 1890. Sir Anthony Macdonnell has been in the Bengal Civil Service since 1864. For the last three years he has been Chief Commissioner of the Central Provinces. In the event of Sir Anthony receiving this appoint. ment, it is expected that Mr. C. J. Lyall will be made Commissioner of the Central Provinces. Mr. Lyall is one of three brothers highly distinguished in the Indian service he is at present Secretary to the Government of India in the Home Department, his brother Sir Alfred being a member of the Indian Council, while his brother Sir James was Lieutenant. Governor of the P unjaib until quite recently. THE Maharajah of Bhannager is persistently anxious to take advantage of every opportunity of showing his loyalty to the reigning house-so persistent, in fact, that one is inolined to half be. lieve he conceives his loyalty to be the object of eternal suspicion. Of course, no suspicion exists; no man could imagine the Maharajah to be a rebel. His frank smile, his geniality, which will obtrude itself notwithstanding his Oriental impassivity, and his easy readiness to make friends are not the elements which foster suspicion. The Maharajah's protestations of loyalty, which take the form of a fervently.uttered admiration for the Queen and the Prince of Wales, are a little embarrassing to his friends. Even when he entertains—and a really charming host he makes—he oppresses his visitors with his flowing periods of Oriental admiration. M. LACRESSONNIERE, the distinguished French actor, whose death is just announced at Paris, struggled for some years before he gained recog- nition. Intended for a oommercial career, he left the desk for the stage, and made a number of uneventful appearances in French provincial towns he became known at the capital. In 1847 his reputation was so far established that he became the favourite actor of Alexandre Dumas and Francois Soulie, who entrusted him with the first roles iii their principal pieces. M. Lacressonniero appeared at the Porte-Saint-Martin, the Theatre Historique, and other theatres in Paris, and for a long period was a first favourite with Parisian playgoers. He was married twice-first to 31dile. Perrier, and seoondly to Mdlle. Abollard, both of whom were talented actresses, and gained much success in the same pieces as M. Lacressennie,-e. GENERAL LORD CHELMSFORD has resolved to at once retire from the army, a decision which was not altogether unexpected by the military author- ities, though Lord Chelmsford had almost another year to run before he reached the age limit, that of sixty-seven. It is no secret that Lord Chelmsford felt that his military career was over when he re- turned from South Africa, which he is said to hare often described as the grave of his reputation. He afterwards held, of course, the lieutenant. governor- ship of the Tower, but he regarded it only ns offet-itig a bridge to a life of seclusion. The terrible disaster of the Zulu War with which his name was associated banishes the memory of his previous good service and yet, in the Crimea and in India he played a gallant part, and. his" great ability and untiring energy during the Abyssinian Wti- were strongly lauded by Lord Napier. He was re- garded, indeed, up to 1879, as one of the most notable figures in the army. 0 THE Vladivostok, published in the Russian Pncifio settlement of that name, gives a terrible account of the treatment of Russian convicts on the Island of Onora. The investigation recently made into the charges of gross and barbarous cruelty preferred against a certain Khanoff, chier labour overseer of the penal island, has resulted in that official's suspension and arrest. This Khanoff, who was himself originally sent out as a deported convict, perpetrated such intolerable tortures upon the unfortunate convicts under Ins charge that twenty of them mutilated themselves in a''dieaclful manner in order to free themselves from the labour yoke of this official miscreant. A much larger number made their escape into the Taiga, where they suffered indescribable misery from bunger and sickness. A recaptured refugee from the Taiga had in his possession some pieces of human flesh, and his confession that the escaped prisoners murdered and ate the physically weaker of their companions has been oonflrmed by subsequent discoveries. Sia SPEHCEB PONSONBY-FANE, who is staying at Balmoral, might, if he chose, write a book which would be more interesting even than the Duc de St. Simon's memoirs, for he has been behind the scenes in Court and politics for over half a century. He has studiously kept silent all the time, and has so completely effaced his own personality in the tran- saction of public business, that he is not even men- tioned by the historians of secret transactions of the Foreign Office, in which he took part between 1840 and 1857. In the latter year he was appointed ComptrolUr of Accounts in Lord Chamberlain's Department, an office which he still holds. In con. sequence he has practically been for thirty-six years the manager of all the Court functions, the ex. aminer of the expenditure of the royal household, the licenser, of plays, and the controller of theatres. In addition to all this work he takes almost as active an interest in cricket as does his brother, Lord Bess borough. No face is better known at Lord's than his, and his influonce with the M.C.C. is great. He used to play himself for Surrey and the Gentlemen." He is sixty-nine years of age and wonderfully active. THE extraordinary desire of young China for employment in the Civil Service, and the trouble it must give the governing authorities triennially when examinations for admission to Government service are held, may be judged from the fact that recently 20,000 candidates presented themselves i at one examination ball in the province of Szechuan. Each candidate's provided with a cell, and, as there were not quite 16,000 cells, only the number for which there was accomodation competed for the vacant posts—one hundred. Candidates for the civil and military service at home are continu- ally complaining of the length of time which elapses before the Cannon Row examiners announce the names of the successful competitors. Evi. dently they do those things better in China, for the result must be published within ten days. There were, in the instance referred to, only a dozen examiners, so that each of them had to get through 130 papers daily. The object of so much speed is to get rid of such a large body of young men, who, while waiting for the result, are apt to become troublesome, if not unmanageable, and allow them to return to their own homes as quickly as may be.

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IJEYAN SCHOOLROOM .-.e PONTNEWYNYDD.

THB PRODUCTION OF WINE IN…

TOPICS OF THE WEEK. j=♦

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AMERICAN STORIES.

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