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0____-C J11 0 0 R R E SP ONDEN…

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0_ C J11 0 0 R R E SP ONDEN OE. TII": latns r npf<:i:non of American word coinage Is con ;iiHe n a:» ar.icle in a Tennessee religioas paper, t" 'and by tlie last mail, whr-re the wrirer reieis to his fulfilment of a promise to give readers "an illustration from real life of the missionary work in the Diocese. lie accompanied the Bishop on a few days' 4 mi3sioiialiug' along the line of the railroad running due south from Jackson to the Lonit-iana lino, ai d thence to New Orleans." ".Aljs,ioitatiiig is hnr(]!y t,.) I)a co:nineuded. THE other day the Mayor of Bucharest, M. Pro'iipuposfi, died. Ho reus buried with becoming houoars, and gifts of flowers came from a very large number of public bodies and private friends. Among others there was splendid wreath from the kins of ltouumnia. Madame Protopopesco, the widow, is however, it would appear, a woman of 4e("idldly practical views. A subscription is being raised just now for the relief of the victims of the inundations in Ronmania. She ordered that all the flowers should lie sold, and that the proceeds should be credited to the fnud. A HERXAN correspondent at Chicago remarks that Germany holds the first place among all nations at the World's Fair. The total value of the Germ-in exhibits, together with the expenses, amcuius to three-and-a-half millions sterling, a jam that has never been reached by any nation at any previous exhibit on. The numimr of German exhibitors who have sent things to Chicago is 6.134, and the different German departments occupy more than h.ilf.a-niil li"n square feet of space, leaving far behind all the other nations with the exception of North America. A PAUL IAMFNTAHT return jost issued shows the number of ex pcriments made on living annima!s during the past year under licences granted under the Act, distinguishing painless from painful expert- merits. *Ciio ntimix-r ot experiments under licences was 1,046, under certificates 2,974, in all 3:960. The total number or persons licensed was 180, of whom 55 performed ni) experiments. In 1892 there were 59 licensed p'nees, in 37 different institutions in England and Scotland and five licensed places were removed during th™ year. The report states that no experiment (other than inoculation or some eqnn) v simp e procedure) is ever pormitted without auaestletich. THE tombs discovered in the neighbourhood of 3attipe;^lia, near Saleino, and which are still the scene or much religions excitement on the part of the population, who continae to bring money and gold ornauianis to the priests, who show them a piece of v !cn):io tiaffstane, as an image of the Madonna, have been visited by some archaeologists, who believe that ti-v belong to the century before the advent of our Lord. A visitor reports having seen the reputed image of the Madonna, which he waya is nothing but a small oblong piece of rongh ston-, w:th a protuberance at one side, which the people take to be the figure of tha child. A pil- grimage to the place oC some 10,000 persons is announced. They trust in this miraculously found Madoons to bring the niach-neaded rain. EBBS BUBIN'STZIN has been talking to an inter- viewer on the subject of the future music of America, which, according to Dr. Dvorak, will be based upon negro melodies. Herr Rubinstein I thinks it quite possible to form a school of music on I such a basis, but the idea he regards as fantastic. He thinks it might take in Sooth America but in North America European music is too far advanced. If the'negroes are allowed free musical education they may devolop music of their own, but that may not come for 50 years. As for going to America, Herr Rubinstein said he was too old to be making a monkey of himself before audiences. He was also a very bad sailor. He had received many enticing offers, but had not accepted them. N early all the proceeds of Ira concerts now are devoted to charit- able purposes. Mas. SOL, the newly-married wife of the chief of the German African station Tobosa, Lieut. Bigl, who accompanied her husband to Africa, has written a letter home to Vienna in which she describes the attack on the caravan which took place on the march front Dar-es-Sulaam to Unsang. wira. Writing from the latter place oa the 15th March, Mrs. Sigl says This is the most horrible station I have ever seen in Africa. An eternal plain covered with shifting sand a foot deep no tree, no bitsh, a very desert, and scorching sun- shine. It has never been so hot as here. It is terrible to think of spending a fortnight here. I am glad to te'l you of Fred's (her husband's) happy return from his war-path. On the night of the 10th they storinjd a p!,w!t-f-,tt camp, sarprisiny all the people, and shooting the Sultan, his faiher, and his wife dead. Fred has had the good luck of killing this old enemy of the Germans, who, from the very first, was at the head of the Arab revolt. He was called Mninitwama, and his village tan. buru. I am so glad that Fred is back again. This was the tirst time that our gentlemen here in Africa, on returning from battle, were received by a European lady." 44 PKESCBIFTIONS made up," according to Dr. j McFerran, or the Philadelphia Collegeof Pharmacy, may soon become an obsolete and unmeaning an. nouncement, and his warning is in some degree repeated by Sir Richard Quain. It is all owing to the lazy habit of prescribing proprietary medicines —that is, not medicines to be made np, but medicines that are already made up and on sale at chemists' shops and drug stores. In America it seems that a system has been introduced of preparing a vast number of compound medicines in the form of a compressed tablets," which have only to be pro- Tided with numbers, like the wines in a club wine- list, in order to reduce the physician's duty to the simple formality of feeling the pulse, looking at the tongue, and writing on a scrap of paper, No. 123, bis in die." The preparations thus vended are Classed under the euphemistic heading of 44 Elegant pharmacy." Authorities who regard it with less 1 favour, among which is our own Pharmaceutical Journal," prefer to describe these articles as factory-niade medicines," and are of the opinion of Dr. McFerran, who declares that he has no faith in the skill of a doctor who prefers the prescriptions of others to his own, nor any respect for the ability of a pharmacist who depends upon others for the supply of products the making of which properly comes within the exercise of his particular call. ing. WHILB many authorities are warning us that we are developing schoolboys' muscles at the expense of their mental cultivation, Mr. William Odell, a well-known surgeon of Torquay, has determined, j in Baconian fashion, to collect data on the subject. Accoi-din L-ly he has addressed a circular of inquiry to head masters of our great public schools and others. Unfortunately, the replies do not keep rigorously tottie-et.;ns 'of Sl I-. Odell squestion, which was simply whether boys who "exce. in thietics "are, as a"rule, equal to their companions in school work and at examinations" but enough testtmony has been obtained to show that on the subject generally there is a considerable divergence of opinion. Mr. Lee, of Christ's Hospital, says that good athletes hold their own in school work, and Mr. Hart Smith of Epsom College agrees, while Mr. Well. don declares that the experience at Harrow is that there is no necessary severance between pro. ficiency in games and in work. lr, Gilkes, of Dolwich, also does not lind that boys who excel in sport are behiud their companions in examinations Dr.Wickham,of Wellington College, finds excel. lence in games and in school works by no means incompatible," and Mr. Selwyn, of Uppingham, refers to the high p aces in school won by his athlltes. This kind of testimony, however, is far from hein uuanirnous. Dr. Shelly, Consulting MedicalOfficor at Haileybury, for example, declares that it is a "rarely broken rule that excellence in athletics and in intellectual work do not go to. gether, though considerable proficiency in both is M tbe rule frequently." Atitl Di-. Hoi-tiby, of Eton, acknowledges that athletics in our public schools have now been brought to such a system that a boy finds in them a great counter-attraction to his reading.

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BURIED IN THE SNOW.!

COLLI! RY PONIES BURNED TO…

THE HOWE WILL SOON BB HOME.…

IFLOODS ON THE MISSISSIPPI.

THE TWO LESSEPS IN PRISON.

-----------A DYNAMITER AND…

I A LIGHTED CANDLE IN A POWDER…

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HE WON flER BY STRATAGEM.

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FACTS AND FANCIES.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE.

ENGLISH SPOKEN HERE.

PEOPLE'S PROPER PIACES.

NOT ALL"THE~SAMET

A FAMOUS RAILWAY FREE PASS.

----------SPRING GUNS.

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HER WEDDING.

HE WALKED.

! THE STRATAGEM OF A QUAKER.

FARE THE WELL.

PERMITTED TO PLAY THE FOOL.

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