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THE AFFAIRS OF MR MARTIN EDWARDS.

---THE HAtfBURY ASSEMBLY ROOMS…

WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.

SAD DEATH OF A PONTYPOOL -…

Tlih NEW PITS AT BARGOED.

REPRESENTATION OF SOUTH MONMOUTHSHIRE.

A GALLANT DEED.

[No title]

"THE WRECK OF THE ARGOSY."

A TRADESMAN'S COMPLAINT.

INFANT BAPTISM : IS IT SCP.WTURAL?

I PROHIBITION & TEMPERANCE…

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PROHIBITION & TEMPERANCE NOTES. (FROM A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.) London. Dec. 21. IT has become an established custom in recent years for the Post Office to issue a request to t ne public to refrain dur.ng the Christmas and New Year season from giving intoxicating drink to Pie postmen. The customary notice has just been Jsuad, and, it is .to be hopecilivill be widely acted /pon. There are of course special reasons why icb a warning should be given at this tune ot ire year, and to which might appropriately be ,lded the suggestion that creature comforts o. a uarmi' ss kind such as tea or coffee and mince pie i •.u* cake might be substituted. The Post Oiuce oificiais could tell terrible stories of the results f the "mistaken kindness" against whicu the official notice is directed. LOCAL Option.in the workhouse" is the would- be smarting heading of a newspaper pal',igl',t,pn which states how the inmates of the I i' g" ton workhouse to the number of 500 have their opinions canvassed on the question of the provision of beer at Christmas. Tho result stated is that out of the 500 only seventeen held up their hands for ginger beer none at all for tea or coffee; eleven for milk none at ail for two- pence in money in place of beer but 470 voted for the beer. It seems at first sight a curious pro- ceeding to have rested such a matter upon the "option" of the paupers themselves. It is not quite clear what the figures are supposed to prove—but what they suggest is the trutn of tile Temperance contention that nine-tenins of the inmates of the workhouse become such through drink ancl even more plainly the further trutn that no total abstainers are to be found among them. A very interesting meeting was held last Thursda3r at Islington. It was a .sequel to tiie London Sclipol Board election, beirgaconversa- zione to celebrate Mr. Thos. Smith's election to that Board. Beside a musical programme some short congratulatory speeches were made by leading representatives of Temperance work, some of whom bad taken an active part in securing Mr. Smith's return. Mr. Smith rightiy reyai d-, his election by 11931 votes, placing him second on the poll; as an unmistakable evidence of the vitality of the Temperance movement; but having fought the battle from first to last on Temperance lines he regards his election as a trust to be exercised on belial of the einidien of London in favour of Temperance teaching. Mr. Smith's maiden speech on the lioard was in favour of definite Temperance teaching being made part of the code, and he and otners de- feated by more than three to one au effort that was made to shelve the question. AN important meeting of ratepayers of the pariah of Horaiey, one of the large and populous suburban districts of London northwards, has just been held to consider what action should be taken in the district to lessen the number of licensed housesT and to prepare for the Brewster Sessions, which in Middlesex and Surrey oceur in March. Resolutions were carried looking to vigorous action, and a. watch committee was appointed (1) to obtain accurate statistics, &(, (2) to watch for breaches of the law in regard to licences in the district; and (3) to take action for the diminution of the number of public- houses. A fighting fund was started, and a. con- siderable sum subscribed. Many other districts might with advantage take similar action,, and indeed the example is one for temperance people everywhere. Ax instructive occurence took place afew days ago in the licensing court of the Fmsbary Con- don) division. A police raid on a public-house led to the discovery of a gang of burglars, and of the proceeds of over seventy burglaries. The landlord is still under arrest as an accomplice. The brewer-owners of the house sought a trans- fer of the licence,, aa of course no such slight cause as that just stated could be alio won to interfere with their "legitimate business." The compliant justices were on the pointof grant- ing the transfer, actually saying they had no option, till corrected by their clerk. They had option, till corrected by their clerk. They had reckoned without the Rev. Septimus Buss, the energetic vicar of the Parish, and a thorough temperance reformer, and when he insisted on being heard, bench and bar (in the interest of the brewers) tried to stop him, and would have done so, doubtless, but for the clerk who cor- rected their law. Ultimately, thanks to Mr. Buss's persis.tance the transfer was refused, and the house closed—subjuct of course to appeal. Moral Temperance people should always. appear in person, and stick to their guns. The Birmingham Daibj Post reports that oo. the occasion of a recent inquest,, held at the Bromsgrove Police-court, the coroner (Mr. Hib- bert) was. called from the room, and on his return apologised to the jury for the delay, and said the chairman of the petty sessions objected to his holding an inquest there, as in his opinion, it was not the pvoper place. In his (the coroner's) opinion, it was the most proper place, and he should hold that inquest and continue to convene inquests there, unless it was objected to by the County Council or other authority. The police-court was a county building erected for county purposes, of which the holding of in- quests was one, and he did not see why a jury should have to go to a public-house while they had that building. The jury agreed with the coroner, and at the close of the inquest, Mr. Hibbert said he should write to the clerk of the county upon the subject. Is this a magisterial effort, in a new direction, to bolster up the public- house ? THE United Kingdom Alliance is giving re- newed attention to the formation of Oirect Veto Associations in various constituencies all over the country, in pursuance of a resolution passed at their last annual meeting. This resolution resis- ted the fact that the Alliance exists for the pur- pose of bringing about the Prohibition of the liq- uor traffic, an object to be best attained by grain- ing the people themselves the power to forbid, by direct veto, the i-sue or renewal of liquor licences in their localities; reiterated the deter- mination to support no parliamentary candidate who will not promise to vote for a measure con- ferring the veto power upon the people, nor to any Parliamentary candidate who is a brewer, distiller, or liquor-seller; and urged the friends of the Alliance in every Parliamentary division to use such means as may combine in electoral organisation, electors and others pledged to ab- stain from voting for, or assisting, any Parlia- mentary candidate who will not promise to vote for the Direct Popular Veto. A terrible story is told of a Birtish adminis- tration in West Africa by Mr. Buxton in the Fortnightly Review. He describes himself as an unbiassed and indepenciint traveller, an English- man desiring only to promote the interest of humanity and religion. The story as he tells it is one of exploiting the natives for the profit of the British trader, and, the writer says, the very air of Africa reeks with rum and gin, imported from England; every house is redolent of its fumes. Over largo areas drink is almost the sole currency and in many patts the year's wages of the negro factory worker are paid altogether in spirits." The rum is sold at nine pence per gallon the gin at 2/6 per dozen pint bottles, and both liquors are known to the natives as the mis- sionary."

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FOOTBALL.

ABERCARN v. BLAINA.

ABERSYCHAN ALBIONS v. CROESY*…

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A THEATRICAL WAIF AT YSTRAD.

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FASHIONS FOR JANUARY.

IA SHOCKING STOITR. !

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DARING ROBBERY IN LONDON.