Hide Articles List

26 articles on this Page

THE AFFAIRS OF MR MARTIN EDWARDS.

---THE HAtfBURY ASSEMBLY ROOMS…

WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.

News
Cite
Share

WORLD'S FAIR NOTES. It is the intention of the Indian Bureau of the U. S. Government to make a complete Indian exhibit, occupying perhaps two acres. Represent- atives of all the leading tribes, especially those of a distinctive type, will be shown, together wit'i their habitations, industries, etc. The Navajos will show their wonderful skill in blanket-weaving; the Zunis, whose customs have been a study for years, will make pottery and live in a "hogan,' as they call their peculia resi- dence the Piutes are to make water bottles of rushes. Then there will be a great collection of relics, weapons and utensils. There will also be in operation a model Indian school under com- Jtetent teachers. The wild bepainted and be- eathered aborigine will be contracted with the civilized orsemi-civiiized Indian of to-day. It is believed that foreigners particularly will be inter- ested in the Indian exhibit. ^A design is being prepared for an iron lift bridge between the agricultural Building and the opposite side of the canal. This bridge is to be so- constructed that it may be raised and permit the passage of boats up the main basin to the Exposi- tion grounds. South Dakota's World's Fair Commission has A canvassing committee of three energetic and eloquent men, who are rapidly raising the 80,000 do's, which the State hopes to expend on its exhibit. The desired 80,000 dols. was fh&t apportioned among different counties according to population. The committee issued a very per- suasive twenty-page pamphlet,an appeal throutjh the press, and then began a crusade of speech- making before crowded public meetings through- out the State. South Dakota will be at Chicago in 1893. An interestinggfeature will be contributed to 'the Department of Women's Work by Mrs. Ernest Harte, who has expressed her intention of asking for space in the Women's Building to Ahow practically what she is doing in County Donegal, Ireland, in educating the poor peasants to weave by the hand loom, and to color the pro- duct of these looms with dyes made by them- selves from materials gathered from the bogs. In addition to having taught the peasants to do this work at their homes Mrs. Harte has built from funds contributed by herself and friends a small mill, and samples of the cloth which is the out- put of the mill, will be exhibited by Mrs. Harte. "While men and boys are employed in this mill it owes its existence to the exertions and intelli- gence of. and is managed by an energetic woman and, therefore, its products can properly come within the Women's Department. The London Lancet closes an editorial, favor- able to the Exposition, in these words: "Indi- rectly, America, as the granary of the world, has much to sfiew affecting food-supply. It is to America that wQ are mainly indebted for the cheapness oi: rood in England, and on this cheap- ness public hoakh in a great measure depends. All ""at oc ii'jorns the storing tinning, preserving, and transporting of meat, fish, and corn from Amer- ica is of great practical importance, and never will there be probably a better opportunity of studying these problems than that which the Chi- cago Exhibition is certain to afford.' The Scandinavian Musical Society of Chicago will chorus of perhaps 1,000 voices for participation in the musical festivals at the Ex- posirio: The publishers of Youth's Companion are per- fecting a plan to provide every school house in the United Spates with an American flag so that at a given hour during the dedicatory exercises the nags can be hoisted simultaneously from one end oc the country to the other. It is believed that by this means ihe interest of young Sople in the Esnosiiion vrili be stimu- li. Mrs. Lou. B.rnesof ticksburg. granddaughter of the late Col. J. W. Xailor, has mher posses- sion the samples of cotton which her grandfather exhibited at the World's Fair in London in 1851, and at the New York Crystal Palace in lq.53, with the mecais awarded him at each. The cotton is still well preserved and Mi's. Barnes intends to send it. together with the medaii.ior exhibition at Chicago in 1803. Word iias been received that iLe Carcovado Railway Lornpa,ny, of Rio de Janeiro, proposes raakiiu:' an exnihit m miniature of its railway. It is the n irpose to large photographs illustra- ting the mountain route through which the rail- wav pa-ses, the bridges, the stations, tbe hotel at the summit, and interesting scenery adjacent. They will have moulded, in papier macne, the mountain of Coreovauo in miniature, with the railway laid down as an actual operation. The total length of the road is two mile. The rise from the station at the upper end of the road to the summit is 2,00,,1 feet. The Patent O.Tice vill exhibit a comprehensive array of models to illustrate the vronderful pro- press of mechanical civilization. One group of models will show the progress of tne printer's art from Gutenori- v's crude invention to the latest rotary perfecting and folding printing press, capable of turning out newspapers at the rate of many thousands per hour. Other groups will show the development of the steam engine, sewing machine, agricultural machinery, applica- tion of electricity, etc.

SAD DEATH OF A PONTYPOOL -…

Tlih NEW PITS AT BARGOED.

REPRESENTATION OF SOUTH MONMOUTHSHIRE.

A GALLANT DEED.

[No title]

"THE WRECK OF THE ARGOSY."

A TRADESMAN'S COMPLAINT.

INFANT BAPTISM : IS IT SCP.WTURAL?

I PROHIBITION & TEMPERANCE…

Advertising

FOOTBALL.

ABERCARN v. BLAINA.

ABERSYCHAN ALBIONS v. CROESY*…

[No title]

A THEATRICAL WAIF AT YSTRAD.

[No title]

FASHIONS FOR JANUARY.

IA SHOCKING STOITR. !

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

DARING ROBBERY IN LONDON.