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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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THE PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT.

EXECUTION AT HORSEMONGER-LANE…

IALL SIMPLICITY and RUDE PLENTY.I

BARON KRUDENER.

SHEEP-FARMING IN JAPAN.

OPENING THE NEW HOTEL DIEU…

THE NAVAL ENGAGEMENT IN THE…

A RECOLLECTION OF SINOPE.

WISE IN THEIR GENERATION.

ATTAR OF ROSES."

A CURIOUS INCIDENT.

DEATH of a MEMBER of the LIVINGSTONIA…

ARMIES FED ON DATES.

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r11■1■■■-— A QUESTION TO BE…

THE COLORADO BEETLE SCARE.

MR. MECHI ON THE CROPS.

THE TASTE FOR SHOOTING.

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THE TASTE FOR SHOOTING. In an article on the 12th of August, the Standard re- marks :— The 12th of August has been said to be held as sacred by the English1 sportsmen as the 15th of the same month is by Frenchmen, or the date of the flight of the Prophet by the unspeakable Turk; and the sacredness is easy of comprehension by the healthy mind, free from crotchets, prejudice, and fanaticism. The 12th of August signifies to several hundreds of the hardest worked men in England that the holiday they prize most has begun A dead set has been made in our time by philoso- Ehical philanthropists against this particular sport; ufc their morbid efforts have failed absolutely when brought into contact with ineradicable national, and, we might add, ineradicable human, instincts. No- body desires to turn every man he meets into a sportsman; indeed, the complaint among sportsmen is that their ranks are too crowded already. But the vast majority of Englishmen would have a moor if they could, and only limitation of soil and deficiency of means prevent the country from being one vast shooting ground. To represent the taste as one con- fined to the upper or upper middle classes is to display an ignorance of national peculiarities, perhaps not un- common among persons deemed specially benevolent. If we except a certain portion of the community who would be found to inhabit provincial towns and to be occupied with the smaller branches of trade, we may say that every class of English society is fond of sport. A dog and a gun are the ideal of a country bumpkin; and the sprightly mechanic of our large towns cherishes a like notion of perfect happiness. Game preserving in the neighbourhood of our large towns has become so difficult, and in fact not worth the candle, simply be- cause the denizens of these crowded centres are themselves incurably addicted t° sport. When it is asserted that poaching springs from hostility to game preserving the real truth of the matter is absolutely travestied. A pc.-tcher is only a sportsman enjoying sport which does not belong to him, because it belongs to somebody else. If he were rich enough he would pay for it. Since he is not, he tries to get it gratis, so passionately fond is he of this paiticular pursuit. If the class that contributes most of our poachers were as fond of silver spoons as of shoeting birds it would be by no means safe to leave spoons about. Man in his most civilised con- dition retains enough of his original self to love the chase of wild things above all other occupations.

SHODDY VINEGAR.

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE MARKETS,

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DETECTIVES IN AUSTRIA. -

THE DEATH OF AZIZ PASHA.

THE FUTURE OF ENGLAND.

BIRDS' PRESERVATION ACT.