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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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THE PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT.

EXECUTION AT HORSEMONGER-LANE…

IALL SIMPLICITY and RUDE PLENTY.I

BARON KRUDENER.

SHEEP-FARMING IN JAPAN.

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SHEEP-FARMING IN JAPAN. The civilisation of the. West has, in many ways, been able to repay the various benefits which we have derived from the more ancient culture of Oriental nations, and the esteem in which such innovations as railways, steamboats, and telegraphs are held by the exclusive Chinese and Japanese, to say nothing of the minor domestic improvements which we have brought to their knowledge, is amply shown by the increasing readiness of these nations to enter into commercial relations with the "outer barbarians." In return for the rich silks, for instance, which we have derived from Japan and China, we have probably conferred no greater benefit on the snhabi- tants of far Cathay than in the introduction of, in the first place, woollen fabrics, and, in the second place, of the animal from which we derive our supplies of wool. Until within the last few years the Japanese Archipelago, though possessing large quan- tities of horses and cattle, did not contain a single sheep or goat. Silk and cotton fabrics were alone known to them, and when, after the opening up of commercial relations with them, Western civilisation brought to their knowledge the useful woollen stuffs, they eagerly bought them up. For many years this trade has gone on increasing enormously; but only recently has it occurred to any one to introduce the sheep itself into the congenial climate of Japan. Ac- cording to the Tokio Times it is to a Californian sheep farmer of the world-renowed name of Jones, and to Messrs. OkubJ, Minister of the Interior, and Jwayama, Japanese student in America and England, that the honour of practically carrying out this idea is due. On the shores of the Bay of Jeddo, a spot admirably, adapted for sheep cultivation, with undulating grassy land, and sloping upwards to the foot of the Tsnkupa mountains, has been chosen for the rearing of the first flock. This locality was originally a natural plateau, adapted by one of the Taikouns in the twelfth century for the pasturage of horses destined for the native army now it has been turned to the more profitable uses indicated above, a portion of 7,500 acres having been set apart for the experi- mental farm established by the Minister of Agricul- ture and his Californian instructor. Twelve hundred sheep of various kinds, including merinos, South- downs, Cots wolds, Lincolns, and Leicesters, have been imported, and are thriving admirably on the rich pasturage provided for them. There seems no reason why the experiment should not prove entirely successful and, if so, the day is not far distant when the hill sides of Japan will be covered with flocks of this most useful animal. Gl,-)be.

OPENING THE NEW HOTEL DIEU…

THE NAVAL ENGAGEMENT IN THE…

A RECOLLECTION OF SINOPE.

WISE IN THEIR GENERATION.

ATTAR OF ROSES."

A CURIOUS INCIDENT.

DEATH of a MEMBER of the LIVINGSTONIA…

ARMIES FED ON DATES.

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r11■1■■■-— A QUESTION TO BE…

THE COLORADO BEETLE SCARE.

MR. MECHI ON THE CROPS.

THE TASTE FOR SHOOTING.

SHODDY VINEGAR.

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE MARKETS,

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DETECTIVES IN AUSTRIA. -

THE DEATH OF AZIZ PASHA.

THE FUTURE OF ENGLAND.

BIRDS' PRESERVATION ACT.