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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. In the HorsE OF LORDS, August 10, the Royal assent was "given by commission to numerous public and private Bills. The Commons' reasons for disagreeing to one of the Lords' amendments to the Metropolitan Street Improvements Bill having been considered, their lordships, with the concur- rence of Lord Salisbury, whose interests the amendment was intended to guard, decided not to insist upon the amend- ment. On the motion of Lord Limerick, the Fisheries (Dynamite) Ml was read a second time, the Duke of Richmond and Crordou reserving to himself the right to object to the Bill u he thought necessary, at a future stage. Lord Colchester asked Lord Derby whether the attention of the Government had been called to reports circulated by the Austrian Press to the effect that the policy of the British Government was to wait and take part in the parti- tion of Turkey. 1 Lord Derby replied that the reports in question had no tounaatiou Whatever. «mle^heSffs' Court (Scotland) Bill, the East India Loan .I risons (Scotland) Bill, and the Canal Boats Bill w ere read a third time and passed. Other Bills were then forwarded a stage, and their Lord- ships adjourned. In the HOU3E OF COMMONS, Mr. Monk asked the Chancellor -of the Exchequer to say whether the Government would deem the temporary occupation of Constantinople by Russian troops so far inconsistent with British interests as to dis- turb the relations of amity between England and Russia. The Chancellor of the Exchequer said, on behalf of the Government, that he felt it his duty to decline to answer the question. At this there was much cheering from the Ministerial benches, and Mr. Monk gave notice that he would raise the question in another form on going into Committee on the Appropriation Bill. Before the House went to the Orders of the Day, Mr. Wlialley read an explanation of his conduct at the previous sitting which had led to his being silenced by the application of the first of the New Rules. The purport of it appeared to be that he was unaware that he was transgressing the Rules of Debate, and that he disclaimed altogether any idea of disregarding the authority of the Chaft. ilr. Sullivan informed the House that he had received a letter from Sir J. Elphinstone, withdrawing the word "ruffiansI" by which, at a Farmers' Dinner, he had des- cribed the "Obstructives," and expressing his regret for having applied it to members of the House. After this gen- tleman-like apology, he said, he should not feel it necessary to persist with the notice he had given to call attention to the speech as a Breach of Privilege. The Chancellor of the Exchequer also read a letter which he had received from Sir James, desiring to apologize to the Speaker and the House for having used the offensive expres- sion. The Expiring Laws Continuance Bill was passed through Committee, and the Turnpike Acts Continuance Bill was read a third time. On going into Committee on the Appropriation Bill, Mr. Oallan called attention to the condition of the dwellings of the Agricultural Labourers in Ireland, and the difficulties placed by the Beard of Works in Ireland in the way of carrying out loans for purposes authorized by the Legis- lature. Sir M. Hicks-Beach, in reply, said that the improvement of Labourers' Dwellings must mainly be left to private effort and as to the conduct of the Irish Board of Works, it would come under the review of the Commission re- cently appointed. Mr. Monk, again referring to the relations between Eng land and Russia, thought it advisable before Parliament separated that the country should be made acquainted with the policy of the Government. He, therefore, asked whether they considered the temporary occupation of the Ottoman capital would necessitate our going to war with Russia ? Sir H. Wolf defended the Government in the course they had hitherto pursued; and he should not approve their answering the question put, the great danger of which would be to give encouragement to one or other of the belligerents. Mr. Forster deprecated discussion as inopportune and disadvantageous to the interests of the country, and this was the opinion in both Houses. The Chancellor of the Exchequer assured Mr. Monk that it was through no want of personal courtesy that he had declined to answer, his question, but simply from a feeling that it was inexpedient at the present time to raise any general discussion; and this view was supported by Mr. Charley, Sir G. Bowyer, Dr. Kenealy, and other speakers, after which the subject dropped, and the Appropriation Bill passed through Committee. The Local Taxation Returns Bill was passed through Committee (Clause 5 having been omitted), and the Municipal Corporations (-New Charters) Bill was also passed through the same stage. The Committee on the Bar Discipline Bill was postponed in order to make way for the Destructive Insects Bill, which was read a second time. The House was engaged in discussing the third reading of the Sale of Food and Drugs Act Amendment Bill, when it was counted out at ten minutes past 11 o'clock.

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