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LOSS OF A MAIL STEAMER.

VISIT OF THE QUEEN TO THE…

GREAT FIRE IN RUSSIA. I

THE COLORADO BEETLE.

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WAR NEWS

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The Bucharest Correspondent of the Standard writes :— I hear from one of the most eminent public personages here that he had an interview three days ago with the Grand Duke Nicholas, who announced without reserve that there wAs no probability of a resumption of operations for twenty days. His Imperial Highness admitted that the troops were somewhat demoralised, and while every disposi- tion had been made and they were ready to repulse any Turkish attack, he should not resume offensive operations until he had received a reinforcement of 100,000 men, which would bring up the force on the right bank of the Danube to 250,000 men. Then he will be able to attack with a certainty of success, and with time to conclude the campaign vic- toriously during the ensuing autumn. This admission con- firms my suggestion some time since that the Russians have never had on the Danube so large a force as they have been credited with." Two thousand workmen are employed on the fortifications of Gallipoli carrying out the plans laid down in 1365. Krupp guns are constantly being sent thither. A telegram from Constantinople states that Mr, Layard has been authorised by Lord Derby to send to England all destitute British subjects desirous of leaving Turkey. A mass meeting was held at Presburg on Sunday, in the presence of General Klapka, at which a resolution was adopted that the Ottoman Empire having granted a Consti- tution to its people, it was desirable that that Empire should be maintained. A story of Count Moltke's opinion. on the Russian pros- pects in the present struggle is circulating in Germany. The great strategist was recently asked by a German nobleman of high rank what course he thought the war would take, and if he did not predict the early and complete subjugation of Turkey. Certainly," replied the Field-Marshal, the Russians will be victorious, only their leader must not lack the four G's which every General requires." "What four G's?" 11 GeZd, geduld. genie, und gliick," replied Von Moltke (money, patience, genius, and good luck).-Time.f Correspondent. The Special Correspondent of a foreign daily Journal, writing to me from Sioinitza, says the difficulties in the way of despatching war news increase every day. As there is no field-telegraph, everything has to be forwarded by special messenger to Bucharest. All letters are read, and those un- favourable to Russia are suppressed. The Correspondent of one of the most important daily papers has not got off a despatch tor ten days, although messages of similar tenour have been accepted for The Times. The sub-special (sic) of another English paper, whose sympathies are avowedly anti- Sclavonic, was stopped and relieved of his despatches, be- cause the wiring of intelligence from over the Austrian frontier was interpreted as primA facie evidence of hostility to somebody! No correspondent, although treated with the utmost courtesy, can go to any particular point without a special permission to that effect, generously granted several hours, and often several days, after the interest attaching to that particular point has ceased to exist". — WhitehaM Review. Telegraphing from Sistova, the Daily News correspondent says :—" Between the bridge and Sistova, the correspondent of the Agence Havas was last night assailed by a Russian soldier, who felled him with a bludgeon, filled his mouth with sand, and attempted to rob him. HA was rescued by four marines, who apprehended the soldier. The corre- spondent is lying in the hospital at Simnit7.a. The soldier was punctually shot here at noon to-day." Rumours of the impending resignation of Prince Gortseha- koff reach us. It would, however, be wrong to suppose that this is owing to the reverses of the Russian army. The real cause Is the ascendency of General Ignatieff in the councils of the Emperor. GortSchakoff is the man of mo- derate views. He knows that Europe would not suffer Russia to accomplish,the plans of the Panslavist party. This party, however, means to incite to war against Turkey all the peoples of the East. The spokesmen are Tcherkaesky and Ignatieff, who are trying to convince the Czar against his will, and are therein warmly supported by the Czare- wjteh. Prince Gortschakofl is said to be highly displeased with this turn of events, and on that ground his resignation is expected.- WhitchaU Review. A correspondent of the RtpuMique Franeaiee, writing from -Nicopolis, states that nothing can equal the insolence of the Bulgarians in that town. The Turkish inhabitants of Nicopolis have, he says, suffered much at the hands of the Cossacks but worse things were in store for them when the Cossacks were succeeded by the Bulgarians. The houses of the Turks were literally wrecked, and the household goods destroyed. In coming out of the Shipka Pass, one of the Horse Artil- lery guns fell sideways oyer a precipice about 140ft. deep. Curiously enough, it was caught by a tree which hung up the string of animals, while the gun thundered down to the bottom. Not a single man or horse was hurt, except a slight flesh wound to one of the horses. The whole were re- covered, and the gun marched in next day, but a good deal of repair to carriage, &c., has since been required."—Times' Correspondent. A Military Correspondent of The Times with the Turkish army writes :—" During a halt of five minutes, when some obstruction occurred, a sweet and soft sound was heard, like the low singing of a perfect choir. It was the Plastouny, the ragged men from the Kouban, some of whom had get together in fropt of the rest, and were singing what seemed to be the most plaintive dirge I had ever heard, quite ex- ceeding in that respect the Highland 'Lochaber no More.' And the burden of the song of these Kouban men in rags was My little cuckoo, where would you fly if I let you go r The. cuckoo answers, I will fly where you toil me; but if I might I would go the Caucasus, which I may see never more." The Pesth Correspondent of the Col-ogne Gazette, reporting upon the hundreds of meetings held in Hungary dnring the past week, both in favour of and against the Turks, states that the pro-Turkish demonstrations were, without excep- tion, a perfect success, whereas the anti-Turkish turned out as complete a failure. The pro-Turkish meetings were held by Maygars, the anti-Turkish by the various Slavonic mationalities.

AN INCIDENT OF THE WAR.

EXECUTION AT CHESTER.

JEWISH MARRIAGES.

EPITOME OF NEWS.

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------AMERICAN HUMOUR.

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