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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT, !

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In the HOUSE OF LORDS, August 6, the Commons' Amend ments to the Crown Office Bill and to some other Bills were agreed to. The Superannuation (Mercantile Marine Fund Officers) Bill and the Treasury Chest Fund Bill were read a second time The other business was disposed of and their lordships adjourned. In the liOUSE OF COMMONS, in answer to Sir C. Dilke, Mr. Bourke said the Government was not prepared to decline to recognise the Turkish blockade of the Black Sea ports as in- effective. In answer to Mr. Cowen, the Chancellor of the Exchequer promised that reports from the British Consuls as to the I late industrial conflicts in the United States should be laid before Parliament. Mr. Trevelyan moved, as an amendment, on going into committee of supply, "That this House, while fully prepared ■ te consider the question of retirement with a view to secure I a sufficient flow ot promotion in the army, cannot, at this late period of the session, proceed to sanction a scheme which demands mature and careful examination, inasmuch as it entails a large increase of expenditure on the English and Indian exchequers, and materially affects the future of our military system." Sir W. Barttelot, Captain O'Beirne, General Shute, Cap- tain Nolan, Sir H. Havelock, and other gentlemen, took part in the debate. Mr. Hardy said the Scheme was an attempt to redeem the solemn promises made to the Army by Lord Cardwell when purchase was abolished, that a now of promotion should be kept up as rapid as that which existed before. The late Government had never done a single act to carry out that solemn engagement, and it had become his duty to appoint the Commission on the Report of which this scheme was founded. Explaining the delay which had occurred, he pointed out that it had been necessary to send the report to India, and as its recommen- dations had now been before the country for a year, all who wished to discuss it had had ample opportunity of making themselves acquainted with all the details. Replying to criticisms on the details, he pointed out that the normal cost would not come into operation for another sixty vears, and with regard to the immediate cost, it would be £ 320,000, of which £ 110,000 would fall on the Indian Revenue. Mr. Treyelyan's suggestion of reorganization by large companies, he showed, was decisively condemned by officers having experience of modern warfare, and especially by Sir G. Wolseley, and as to reorganization for mere economy's sake, without reference to efficiency, he emphatically declared thst he would never put hishaud to it. Compulsory retirement, the necessity fur which he explained, would not come into operation for three years; and as to the Honorary Colonelcies which he was blamed for not abolishing, they were the rewards of a long career which even when they were taken into consideration was not over paid. There were many points in the scheme on which he should be glad to defer to the opinion of the House of Commons, and it was, moreover, a tentative scheme over which the House and Minister would retain control, and which would create no new vested interests. In these circumstances, he implored the House, with as little delay as possible, to give the Army the benefit of the Warrant. The Marquis of Hartington commented on the difficult position in which the House was placed in having to decide on a scheme to which it could not give adequate considera- tion. He saw no reason for appointing a Commission. All the noces8ary steps for settling a scheme of Retiremeut could have been arranged at the War Office, and the Commission, he mnintaincd, had not grappled with the real difficulty —the disproportion betwetn the offieers in the higher and lower ranks. He intended to vote for Mr. Trevelyan's resolution as a protesL alrainst the manner in whieh the question had been brought before the House; but if it were negatived, he should recommend the House to abstain from a minute discussion of the details of the scheme, which at this period of the Session was impossible. He should regard it as a temporary expedient to meet a temporary purpose, and all the questions of reorganization must be held to be quite open. Among the advantages which had been obtained from the abolition of Purchase was the power of making changes in the organization of the Army without coming across private interests. Sir A. Gordon made some remarks deprecating compulsory retirement and throwing out suggestions for regimental reorganization, after which Mr. Trevelyan's Resolution was negatived by 139 to 77. After the House had gone into Com- mittee, two dilatory motions were made, one by Mr. Rylands and the other by SirG. Campbell Mr. Fawcett spoke at length in support of both, but the first was negatived by 128 to 63, and the second by 124 to 30. Ultimately the Vote for the pay of General Officers was carried by 111 to 41 and the other Votes for Half-pay and Retired Allowances and for the Army Purchase Commission connected with the Retirement Scheme were agreed to with- out a division. Some other business was then disposed of, and the House adjourned.

--_.._---_---_-THE REV. NEWMAN…

THE LATE AZIZ PASHA.

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MR. GLADSTONE AT HOME.

A BISHOP ON BISHOPS.

THE FEAR OF TORPEDOES.

The POSSESSION of CONSTANTINOPLE.

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----SENTENCED TO DEATH.

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THE "HEAT" OF DEBATE.

DISTRESS IN RUSSIA.

THE LATE MR. WARD HUNT.

A MILITARY GLUTTON.

THE RUSSIAN RETREAT FROM PLEVNA.

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

EPITOME OF NEWS. E