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VITALITY OF THE COLORADO BEETLE.

THE EDUCATIONAL VALUE OF FLOWER…

.-THE AMERICAN FOOD SUPPLY.

THE REV. A. TOOTH AT ST. ALBAN'S,…

THE ' DISORDERLY ELEMENT"…

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THE DISORDERLY ELEMENT" IN AMERICA. he New York ,!imes,.in an rticle on the recent railway strikes in the United States, writ's as follows :— The violence which has accompanied the railroad strikes has been unprecedented in extent, but is by no means inexplicable. The rioting spirit that has pre- vailed is due in the main to two general causes—one, the unhealthy development of trades unionism; the other, the growth of an idle and vicious clats which necessarily goes on, pari passu, with the increase of our population, its concentration in cities of greater or less size, and the segregation of workers in special trades and classes in consequence of the subdivision of labour. The evil side which has been seen in American trade unions for a long time has been deeply regretted by the more intelligent of their members. It has taken form mainly in the abuse of power, in the resort to compulsion where compulsion was neither expedient .nor justifiable. This has been due partly to the want of reflection and sufficient in- formation among the unionists, but chiefly to the reck- less ambition of demagogic leaders. The unions are, on a small scale, democratic societies and they have fallen a prey to the schemers who have always infested such societies. In the majority of cases a deliberate expression of the zandid opinion of the Body of the men interested would have prevented the strikes, or at least prevented lawlessness when the strikes occurred. But there has, nevertheless, been a cer- tain spirit of lawlessness among the body of the trades unions. In the recent strikes there has been a general and prompt readiness on the part of all the class affected to step boldly across the line of right and law, and not only to assert their own resolution not to work, but to prevent others from working, however much they wished to do so. The strikers had not been responsible for all the violence—perhaps for very little of it—but they began it by intimidating the men who took their places, and by stopping trains by main force. There is only a difference in degree between this and firing cars, burning depots, and stoning soldiers and policemen. But the most con- spicuous, if not the most important feature of the riots at Baltimore and Pittsburg, has .been the share taken in them by the thieves, ruffians, and loafers of the respective places. It is not to be denied that these, forming our dangerous class," are every year growing more numerous. The possibility of such a not as took place at Pittsburg in a comparatively small city whllse population is principally industrial, and which forms one of the chief railroad and manu- facturing centres of a powerful State, is certainly a fact to which we cannot give too much atten- tion. What oceurred on Saturday and Sunday at Pittsburg may happen at Buffalo, at Albany, at New York, any large town when the occasion offers. Appa- rently the occasion, in. this case, was not a very threat- ening one, but the events which attended it have shown that there are capacities for disorder in our cities which cannot safely be overlooked. In short, with our growth in wealth and numbers and in indus- trial activity, we are gradually acquiring those elements of vice and lawlessness which we had fondly hoped were confined to the older and less liberal countrie^of Europe. As our people are crowded, they grow restlesfl; the indefinite capacity of expansion upon untried lands is being lost; the struggle for advance- ment begins to change here and there into a struggle for existence, and with these changes come the oppor- tunities and temptations for violence. The situation constantly becomes more complex, and it will yet tax all the moderation, courage, and wisdom of our people to properly meet it.

----------RUSSIAN ACCOUNT…

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r WAR NEWS.! !-

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COST OF CLOSING THE DANUBE.

STRIKE OF AMERICAN COLLIERS.

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PRANCO-GERMAN ATROCITIES.

ROMANCE AT THE DIAMOND FIELDS.

A PAINFUL MEETING. J

A HINDOO PHILANTHROPIST.

AMERICAN HUMOUR.

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