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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

A CHINESE TRAGEDY.

[No title]

A NAVAL MYSTERY.

THE BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON…

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THE BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON OUR EASTERN POLICY. At a meeting held in Manchester on Monday, in support of Dr. Ziemann, the bishop delivered a speech on our Eastern policy. He ventured to say that for the last two years diplomatists and foreign secretaries had been peddling with this great question, and they were no nearer the solution to-day than when the insurrection first commenced in July 1875. Lord Derby had told them—he (the bishop) spoke of him with the greatest possible respect, and he did not know that any other Foreign Secre- tary moving on his lines could have managed better—that all through the transaction the aim of himself and the English government was to keep this country out of the war. He (the bishop) was no politician or statesman, but when persons who were simply gifted with the ordinary faculties of observa- tion saw how little light statesmen and diplomatists had been able to cast on these mysterious transactions, they began to think these ordinary faculties were suf- ficient for coming not altogether to an erroneous con- clusion upon the great and important subject. He ven- tured to say that they were never so close to the brink of war as they were at the present moment (hear, hear), and that of all the wars they had been engaged in this would be a war they would be less able to justify than any. About twelve months ago the English Government sent a fleet to Besika Bay. It was said to have been sent for the protection of the Christians at Constantinople, but it was felt in Constantinople and throughout Europe to be a moral and almost a material support to the cause of the Turks. It was not to his mind altogether improbable that the sending of the fleet to Besika Bay in May or June, 1876, had more or less sustained the Turks in their dogged determination not to yield to the united force of Europe, nor in any way to abate one jot of the pretensions to govern these subject provinces in that violent and dogmatic way which Dr. Ziemann had so graphically described. Now again in the month of July, 1877, a year later, the English fleet is again in Besika Bay, because, as the Chancellor of the Ex- chequer said, it was a convenient situation to operate from. Convenient for what purpose, he might ask ? A year ago the fleet in Besika Bay was regarded as a support to Turkey. He ventured to say. that to-day the presence of the fleet could only be regarded as a menace to Russia. What the English nation ought to do was to resolve to throw in her lot with those who were endeavouring to remove the cause of the present distress. (Hear, hear.) So long as Turkish misrule and Turkish misgovernment prevailed in those provinces, Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham and England generally would have to subscribe to relieve it, because it would be chronic and perpetual. (Cheers.) He never could see why this country could not have received the Berlin Memoran- dum. The Andrassy Note, he admitted, was a feeble document. It merely provided for certain represen- tions being made to the Sultan, to exact new guaran- tees for good behaviour which we asked should be secured. Our Government accepted that feeble Andrassy Note but when in the month of May, 1876, there came out a more stringent document-the Berlin Memorandum—which was agreed to by Russia, Germany, and Austria, and accepted without hesita- tion by two other of the six great Powers—Italy and France—our Foreign Secretary declared that the English Cabinet would not act upon the lines of that Memorandum, and held that it would not succeed in producing the result which it seemed to sketch. He had attended the meeting with much pleasure, and he should not be true to his convictions, or have the courage of his opinions, if he did not, probably at the risk of a good deal of obloquy and misrepresentation, state to them what he thought.

I ====== SALMON POACHERS.

IN THE MIDST OF BURSTING SHELLS.

RUSSIAN PRISONERS IN TURKEY.

MONEY ORDERS AND POSTA^ NOTES.

DEATH OF MR. J. C. MARSHMAN.

[No title]

A COSSACK CAMP.

BOARD OF TRADE RETURNS.

THE COLORADO BEETLE.

ON THE DANUBE.

M^—** LORD SANDON ON RELIGIOUS…

SELECTED ANECDOTES.

THE MARKETS.