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A THINKING MACHINE!-

DISCOVERY of a SHIPWRECKED…

THE TWO AMBASSADORS.

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iPEACE OR WAR WITH THE GREEKS.

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PEACE OR WAR WITH THE GREEKS. The Correspondent of the Daily News, writing from Athens, says" If anyone should ask whether the Greeks are glad or sorry just now to avoid a quarrel with Turkey, I should answer that they do not know. They themselves cannot tell any better than a stranger whether they would be glad or sorry to take the plunge. The common people would certainly cheer on their Government to a war, how- ever rash. The soldiers and sailors would like it,' as a matter of course. But the upper classes in Greece, the men with something to lose, who know more of the difficulties in the way, and on whom the losses would chiefly fall, are not by any means sanguine about a war. They see the' danger of not fighting, clearly enough. But they see also the im- mense risk of beginning a struggle, even with Turkey, until Greece has had time to prepare It is dangerous for the politicians to lose their popularity by maintaning peace when the world is ringing with war news. It is dan- gerous for the rich to risk social convulsions and class jealousies by being thought unpatriotic. Yet neither politi- cians nor rich men seem inclined to move at present. There must be some great Turkish defeat in Bulgaria—nobody here cares about Asia-or some rising in the Greek provinces of Turkey, attended by massacres of Greek-speaking people, before the popular feeling against Turkey can become irre- sistible. At present there is only strong excitement. The Greeks do not forget that numbers of their countrymen are in Turkish bondage. They remember it only too bitterly. But the comforts and responsibilities of free national life make them fa. less ready to run tremendous risks than they would be if still under the yoke." The Bremen Weser Zeitung, a journal not unfriendly to Russia, says It was discovered on the eve of the war that only thirty per cent. of the Russian Navy wece fit to go to sea. Even some iron-plated vessels were found unfit for active service, having boilers and engines of an impossible description. The fact that of ten iron steamers of the Caspian flotilla only five are in serviceable condition tends to retard the reinforcement of the Caucasus Army. It is stated that the Russians have been experimenting at Odessa with a new engine throwing some dreadful liquid on to the deck of hostile ships to remove the crew before the torpedo attack is made. An iron boat for the discharge of Whitehead torpedoes is being built at Mr. Baird's wharf in the Neva, 115ft. long, 16ft. broad. The boat will be 7!ft, at bow, and 10ft. at the stern. The engines will be powerful enough tor the boat to attain a velocity of 17 miles an hour. The name of the boat, which costs 100,000 roubles, will be Very-A nglicë, Explosion. The exact losses sustained by the Russians in the passage of the Danube on June 27 have now been ascertained, 289 were killed, 398 wounded, and 38 are reported as missing. • '^le i!?' ^e^er8burg Ruski Mir says there is reason to be- lieve that the new French Cabinet have agreed with England as to naval operations in the East. The article of • *lr concludes with the words, caveant Consoles ne quid detrimenti capiat Respublica." A telegram to the Augsburg AUgemeine Zeitung states that the losses of the Russians in the recent engagements nave been enormous. The hospitals in Roumania are already crowded to inconvenience. The general results of the week's fighting and bombard- ment along the line of the Danube are, immense destruction of property, and great loss of life amongst the inoffensive inhabitants."—Correspondent of Daily Telegraph. A Vienna telegram says that in Montenegro the whole of the Zeta Valley, formerly the richest part of the country, is now devastated, and its most gallant defenders are dead or wounded. The Montenegrins have been victorious, but their victories have also been ruinous. Thousands of corpses are hidden in precipices and forgotten and are tainting the air. Typhus and famine threaten the land. This dangerous state of things also influenced the Turks to withdraw. The Correspondent of The Times, writing from Therapia, says:—"There were some successful torpedo experiments made in the Arsensal a few days ago. The construction of the torpedo was very simple, consisting of gun-cotton in a preserved meat tin at the end of a pole, and fired by electricity from a small battery placed in the boat. It is very remarkable how little noise there was or throwing up of water. There was o*ly a slight upheaving of the sea and a very subdued sound of explosion. The vessel, an old merchant ship, gave a slight lurch and then sank rapidly. As she has not yet been got up again, the extent of the harm done to her is not yet ascertained." One thing is certain. At any time now one great battle may settle the whole question. If the Turks can suc- ceed in hurling back the Russian Army upon the Danube, its chances for this year are over. If, on the contrary, the Russians, in one pitched battle, defeat and destroy the Turkish army, the Balkans cease to be an obstacle, and Adrianople lies open to the invader. Any day we may learn that the Turkish army is defeated, and, not to waste time over the successive steps of the argument, that Constanti- nople and Gallipoli lie at the mercy of Russia." —The World.

AMERICAN HUMOUR. *

EPITOME OF NEWS. BRITISH AND…

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