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PENILLION.

----WIT AND HUMOUR.

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! PURGATORY.

THE CASE OF "PROTECTION."

THE FARMERS' EXODUS TO AMERICA.

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THE PRESIDENCY OF AMERICA.…

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BREAKING A PINT AGAINST A…

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THE SALVATION ARMY.

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THE SALVATION ARMY. RELEASE OF MISS LOUISA LOCK AND HER FELLOW-PRISONERS. Tho liberation of Miss Louisa Lock and the other "Salvation Army captives," from Cardiff Gaol, took place on Monday. They had been confined there according to the decision of the Pentre magistrates, for obstructing the high- way, by holding a prayer meeting in the street on a Sunday afternoon. A short account of the case appeared in our last. It will bo remem- bered that Miss Louisa Lock, with other mem- bers of the Salvation Army, refused to pay the fine, preferring to be sent to prison. Miss Mary Lock had paid the fine, under her elder sister's advice, for the purpose of being free to carry on the work. The Misses Lock, with their mother, are residing at Ystrad, and to this place the released lady-captain and her troop of offi- cers returned from Cardiff by train. Some of their friends had gone to Cardiff to meet them. At Pontypridd, a hearty demonstration was give to them as they passed, and on tips and such places up the line from Llwynypia to Pentre, dense crowds were congregated, shout- ing and waving handkerchiefs and bonnets, as well as from the upper windows of the houses. At Ystrad, preparations had been made on a large scale to give them a positively enthusias- tic welcome, and flags and banners were hung out all along the streets, inscribed "Welcome home to the prisoner," &c. Thousands of per- sons had assembled at the railway station pre- vious to the arrival of the train, and the station gates were literally besieged, the Salvation Army band, with their flag borne aloft, being in front. As the train drew up and Miss Lock was recognised, shouts of "Hallelujah" and "Amen arose from the vast crowd, and when she and those arriving with her came forth from the gate, a grand procession was formed, Miss Lock and party leading the way, and all marched towards Tonybedw field (at the end of Pentre), singing hymns, particularly a Welsh one appropriate to the event. On its way, the crowd was augmented by waiting hundreds, until, on arriving at their destination, it was computed to have consisted of not less than 20,000 persons. Meanwhile the rain poured down in torrents, but was unheeded by the en- thusiastic multitudo. Miss Lock and others of those just released addressed the people, ex- pressing their joy at finding themselves at home again, but saying they were willing to suffer in the same way again for the same great cause. The prison fare they described as broad and water, but they did not eat much of the bread —they prayed to be kept from hunger that they might not be obliged to do so. The labour was picking oakum, which Miss Lock said was the easiest work she had ever done. James Edwards, one of the speakers, had been in prison before that for drunkenness, but did not feel as happy there then as he now had done. He produced a dark lump of bread he had brought from the gaol, which caused much laughter. In the even- ing, services were held in the chapels, 26 of which are said to have pronounced against the sentence. General Booth sent to say that he had wired to the 150 divisions of the Army in the United Kingdom, requesting their prayers for those in Cardiff Gaol. It seems a pity that the magistrates could find no other means of dealing with the leaders of the Salvation Army in the Rhondda Valley than by fining them, and sending them to prison in default. We can understand the necessity of curbing the out-door proceedings of these ec- centric religionists in towns where the greater part of the population are annoyed, rather than elevated, by their eccentricities but it is other- wise in the populous villages of the Rhondda Valley in Glamorganshire. For some months the I, Salvationists" have been hard at work among the rougher portion of the mining popu- lation, and the result has been a large increase in the membership of the various chapels that stud the valley. It is not as at Coventry, where a watchmaker the other day attempted to cool the advance of a Salvation Army leader by pour- ing three buckets of water over him. It appears that in the Rhondda: Valley almost the whole population are more or less in sympathy with these people. The prisoners were escorted to the railway station by some thousands of people singing Revivalist hymns, and, to add to the oddness of the scene the very policeitien were in toars.&hat«ver Jithe extravagances of the Salvationists," thetestimony of impartial wit- nesses on the spot, representing able provincial journals, is that they are creating a marked im- pression upon the roughest population where they work. It is to be hoped that the magis- trates will exercise as much forbearance towards them as possible.-The Echo.

PENTYRCH & MELINGRIFFITH WORKS,

STEEL RAILS VERSUS IRON.

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RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY.

ROYALTY INCOGNITO.

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THE DISCREET BOASTER.

ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG MAN,…

CHANGE IN THE LAW OF BILLS…

j NEW VOLUNTEER REGULATIONS.I…

SALT MINING IN CHESHIRE.

TRAMPS.

GRAIN CROPS IN AMERICA.

THE NEW CHIEF JUSTICE OF GIBRALTAR.

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ITHE MARQUIS OF HARTINGTON…

CLOSE OF THE SIX DAYS' BICYCLE…

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