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PENILLION.

----WIT AND HUMOUR.

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! PURGATORY.

THE CASE OF "PROTECTION."

THE FARMERS' EXODUS TO AMERICA.

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THE PRESIDENCY OF AMERICA.…

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The following letter from the seat of war in Zululand has just been received by Mr Charles Harris, shoemaker, Sowhill:— Upoko River, Zululand, July 27th, 1879. Dear Uucle and Aunt,—I now take the pleasure of writing these few lines to you, hoping it will find you all in good health, as I am happy to tell you it leaves me at present. My dear Aunt, I send this letter just to let you know about the memo- rial I have sent to you about the men of my regi- ment that fell at the Battle of Isandhlwana and Rorke's Drift on the 22nd of January. The officer commanding our depot at Brecon will forward it to you you will have nothing to pay on it when you receive it. I dare say you will get it by the time you receive my letter. I have sent you two, and you will please to give one to my sister; and please to take care of them, so as we can see them when we come home. We all three are in very good health; my brother Caul is in the l-24th Regiment, and I and Charley are in the 2-24th, but we see each other very often; my brother Caul is stopping at a place called Fort Newdigate. Charley and my Company are now on the march up the country, and we came by Fort Newdigate and saw Caul. He is looking well. I believe' his Regiment is coming home soon. They are going on the march next week down the country, but Charley and my Company are on the march up. I don't know yet where we are going. I think we have a few days heavy marching to do yet before we can come back; we heard here, at the place we are at now, that we have to go to Ulundi, the King's Kraal, where the last battle was fought at. There is great talk about my Regiment coming home, but we shall be able to know more about it in a week or two. I hope we shall, for we both have had enough of knocking about in this country during the last eighteen months, through bushes and over mountains. We lost a lot of the Ponty- pool boys out here, at the Battle of Isandhlwana. There were Alfred Farr, Dick Treverton, George Morris, Harry Smith, Charley Long, and Bill Reece (from Pontnewynydd) they all got killed. I and Charley can think ourselves lucky, for we I were staying m the same camp, only we were out with the General; we left Alf Farr in the tent asleep when we went out; the reason Alf stayed in was because he was butcher for the Regiment. I think I have told you all the news at present. Please give all our loves to our cousins. So now I must conclude by sending our love to you all. From your ever affectionate nephew, FRED EVANS, 2-24th Regiment.

BREAKING A PINT AGAINST A…

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THE SALVATION ARMY.

PENTYRCH & MELINGRIFFITH WORKS,

STEEL RAILS VERSUS IRON.

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RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY.

ROYALTY INCOGNITO.

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THE DISCREET BOASTER.

ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG MAN,…

CHANGE IN THE LAW OF BILLS…

j NEW VOLUNTEER REGULATIONS.I…

SALT MINING IN CHESHIRE.

TRAMPS.

GRAIN CROPS IN AMERICA.

THE NEW CHIEF JUSTICE OF GIBRALTAR.

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ITHE MARQUIS OF HARTINGTON…

CLOSE OF THE SIX DAYS' BICYCLE…

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