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ABERSYCHAN LOCAL BOARD.

A GAMEKEEPER FINED FOR KILLING…

THE FLOODS IN NTORTH WALES.

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LLANFRECHFA UPPER LOCAL BOARD.

ARRIVAL OF CAPTAIN CAREY.—HIS…

STRANGE CHARGE OF BIGAMY.

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LOCAL AND DISTRICT NEWS. -----

BLAENAVON.

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VARTEG.

ABERSYCHAN.

PONTNEWYNYDD.

! GRIFFITHSTOWN.

CWMBRAN.

ABERGAVENNY.

CAERPHILLY. !

SWANSEA.

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ISPECIAL SERVICES AT GLASCOED…

ACTION AGAINST THE BLAENAVON…

LATEST MARKETS. L

MAIDSTONE CORN MARKET.—THURSDAY.

BRISTOL CORN MARKET.—THURSDAY.

--LONDON HAY MARKET.—THURSDAY.

LONDON CATTLE MARKET.—THURSDAY.

BRISTOL CATTLE MAR-KET.-THurSDAY.

AN APPALLING NIGHT.

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AN APPALLING NIGHT. An account of nit: experiences or tne five men who went out to rescue some boys who were in peril at the Swansea Regatta, and who were at first sup- posed to be drowned, is published in the South IFola Daily News. Eight brave fellows, named John Edwards, John Cornelius, Thomas Thomas, John Banks, Alfred Teesdale, George George, David Davies, and Thomas Richards (a bov), volunteered to go to the assistance of a number of lads, who were seen in distress abont two miles from land. The sea was very rough at the time, and, as a violent wind was also raging, the occupants of the boat had no slight task before them. They put out about five o'clock and in two hours succeeded in coming up to the boys, when three of the men—Edwards, Banks, and David Davis—transferred themselves to the boys' boat, and after some hard work, were picked np by a passing barque. The other boat, containing the four men and the boy disappeared from view, and nothing has been heard of it excepting a vaguo account to the effect that it had been seen, when the men were making for the Mumbles. It now ap- pears that after being left by the three men named the remaining five tried to keep up with the other boat, and that, by some means, the two craft parted company. Shortly after this a heavy storm came on, obscuring the view and rendering the men almost helpless. They say that they were near enough to the barque which rescued their companions to hear shouting from the ship to the boat, and that they tried in vain to get up to her. They felt themselves washed further and further out to sea, the boat in- clining in the direction of Nash Point, and at this point the fury of the storm was at its height. They became exhausted, and for a time were unable to usa the oars, of which they then had but three, when a huge wave swept over the boat and completely cap- sized her, throwing the occupants into the water. Fortunately they could all swim, and, having recovered the oars, they succeeded, though with great difficulty, in clutching the boat so as to save themselves. One of them went to the bow and the others to the side, by which means they managed to heave the boat into her proper position The men were then fortunate enough to regain their places, and, as a mist was fa,t approaching, they again applied themselves to the ours, though in a half despairing kind of way. Anon the poor fellows became exhausted, gave up pulling, resigned themselves to what they considered their inevitable fate—a watery grave. Again, and once again, they were thrown into the water, but managed to readjust the boat, when they were dashed upen some rocks. The bottom of the boat was stove in, and the occupants were much knocked and bruised about the body. Upon regaining their feet they climbed up the rocks, ur.til a place of comparative safety w-s reached. The place at which the men were wrecked was very near to Nash Point, where the sands are verv dangerous. They remained upon the sands until nine in the morning, when they left for Bridgend, and, after being hospitably treated in a farmhouse at that place they took the first train for Swansea, anivmg there in the evening.

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PONTYPOOL PETTY SESSIONS.

PONTYPOOL POLICE COURT.

DESTRUCTIOF A TOWN BY FIRE.