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LIEUTENANT CAREY. -

MEETING of TIN-PLATE WORKERS

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-----THE LONDON AND PROVINCIAL…

DEAN STANLEY AT LLANDAFF CATHEDRAL.

PIIILANTHROPIC SOCIETY.

SIR GARNET WOLSELEY'S AMERICAN…

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SIR GARNET WOLSELEY'S AMERICAN EXPERIENCES. A PARIS paper says: Sir Garnet Wolseley has done much fighting, and he has seen more. He has always made a point of going to look for it when he had the chance. In the American civil war he followed the operations for a long while on the Confederate side, as there was more experience to be gained among a minority ably officered than among a majority who at first had numbers and not much else. Sir Garnet, then Colonel, Wolse- ley made his way with a friend to Baltimore in 1862, just after the battle of Antietam..1 He wanted to get further south, if possible to Richmond, rightly guessing that the war was far from being at an end. To do this they had to cross the Potomac, or, as it was then called, run the blockade' between the two States, at a point where the river was frozen and almost as troubled in bad weather as the sea itself. The Federals kept a sharp look-out both from gun-boats and from military stations on shore. The boats car- ried a lime light, and if the slightest noise was heard at night they illuminated the whole ex- panse for a quarter of a mile from their prows. The population was friendly—that was the only thing in our travellers' favour; for the rest everything was against them, both land and water being in strong hostile occupation. "At last they reached a fisherman's cottage, overlooking the stream. The fisherman was afraid to house them, as his cottage was under the sur- veillance ot a i ederal patrol, but he told them to return next day; and they had to pass the night in a village, a prey to heat and musquitoes. On the following morning they stole back to the hut, and bargained for a passage across in the fishing boat at the rather high fare of seventy dollars in gold. They were to pass the day in hiding in the hut, and to set forth in the night. They were not on any account to be seen outside the premises be- fore that, lest their appearance should excite the suspicion of the keen watchers on the river, who according to the fisherman, kept that part of the shore under their glasses as well as under their guns. They sat down to watch out the day, when, at about two in the afternoon, the fisherman in a state of great excitement announced that a Fede- ral officer and a file of men were approaching the hut. There was no time for flight or hiding, so the pair quietly stayed where they were. When the officer entered, the colonel "s companion asked him if it would be possible to get permission for a little duck-shooting on the river. The astonish- ed officer thought that it would not. In that case, said the other, will you be good enough to tell two unfortunate sportsmen how they are to get back to Washington.' The officer did not like the look of it, and he was just hesitating about his answer when Col. Wolseley stepped forward, cigar-case in hand, and ottered him a regalia. It was the psychological moment of decision, and he had seized it. The officer took the cigar, and answered that a Wash- ington steamer would call at about four the next morning at a neighbouring wharf. Long before that time, of course, Colonel Wolseley and his friend were safely in Virginia. "They parted with the officer on excellent terms though a corporal who had seen, if not more of the service, at least more of the world, did not hesitate to communicate his suspicions of them to his chief. The young fellow stuck to his faith in the story of the duck-shooting, and left them to wait for the steamer. The fishing-boat duly came at night- fall, and with Wolseley and the other lying well covered in the bottom, cast its nets and tacked, under the very nose of a Federal gunboat, in the most innocent way in the world, until the master saw his way to put them ashore. They subse- quently reached Lee's head quarters."

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TURNING THE TABLES.

MARRIED BEFORE HE KNEW IT.

SNOW SKATES.

MOTHER WIT.

WAR.

I THE WORLD WOULD BE THE BETTER…

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]

ICHAPTER XIII.

'THE REPRESENTATION OF MONMOUTH-ISHIRE.

AN INTERESTING NUMBER.

A JAPANESE PRISON.

THACKERAY'S HABITS AND PERSONAL…

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