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POLICE COURT.

INCONGRUOUS MEMORIALS IN PROTESTANT…

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PONTYPOOL BRANCH OF THE CHURCH…

PROPOSED

-THE EMIGRANTS.

SERIOUS RIOT AT PONTLOTTYN,…

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A BURGLARY FRTJSRTATED.

THE ANTIQUITIES OF LLANTWIT.

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THE ANTIQUITIES OF LLANTWIT. (From Rev. D. Lloyd Isaac's "Siluriana.") The group of buildings at Llantwit of the Z-1 present day is one of the most interesting in the principality. The site is in a deep valley, below the town. The strange, elongated pile of the church, itself a remarkable conglomeration of distinct buildings, is flanked at the south entrance by a bold fragment of what was ouco a gatehouse; and crowning the crest of an opposite hill is the dilapidated structure of tho old tithe barn, surrounded by other scattered remains of school-houses, crosses—memorial and sepulchral—all bearing witness to the au- cient greatness of Llanilltyd. The church and churchyard arc teeming with relics of antiquity. First, there is the Lady- chapel, forty feet and a half in length, decora- ted with statues of saints. Next comes the old church, being G-1 feet long. Lastly, a more modern church, which was crcctcd by Richard Neville, Lord of Giamorgan-tcmp. Ilenry I. Z, This structure is 98 feet by 53, with a tower containing six bells of exquisite tone. In a garden adjoining the churchyard aro traces of the ancient college. It was here that the 2,000 students of Iltutus had been ponder- ing over languages—preparing themselves fur the battle of life-and the rest of the grave. The tithe barn on the hill is 120 feet by 27 feet; and there are people living who saw this huge building crammed to the ridge, with ten or twelve sacks outside. The Tithe Commutation Act has played the vcngcancc with this old pile. Its fino oak roof has disappeared, and the old walls only wait upon the behests of Father Time. There arc several monuments and effigies of antiquity in the church and chnrchyard. Tho Cross of St. Iltutus, erected by Archbishop Samson, in the sixth century, is, perhaps, the most noted. Ita present height above the ground is about six feet, and its breadth diminishes from two feet to one foot on the top. T,io caning is finely executed, and the sides are divided into compartments, with the following inscription -'Crux Iltuti, Samson possu-^t hunc cruccm pro anima ejus." But we li -d better give the inscription as we find it in lolo's 1\168. In nomine Dei summi, incissit crux salvatoris quam prcparavit Samson Abbas, pro anima sua ct pro auiina Ithaeli regis, et Artmali dccari." That is, in English,—" In the namo of God most high, here begins the cross of tho Saviour which Samson the Abbott prepared for his own soul, and the soul of King Ithael, and of Artniael the Dean." The disentombment of this old stone is attri- butable to old Iolo Morganwg, as follows, per his own account About forty years ago a very old man, named Richard Punter, li^ed ,.t Llanmaes, by Llantwit, a shoemc'r, bat mora intelligent than his class in general, and had his mind well stored with traditions. When I was about fourteen years of ago (circa 1758), he showed me one day a spot, on the cast side of Llantwit church, where he said* that an old monument stone stood formerly and the tradi- tion how it fell he gave thus :—There was a young man lived at Llantwit, cpmmonly called Will the Giant he was seven feet and a half long. Owing to premature growth, lie died seventeen years of ago. lie had expressed a wish to be buried by the old pillar by the porch. According to wish, his grave was dug therei i. But just as the corpse had been laid down, tl.o old stone fell down into the grave, and s<- to. save trouble of the resurrection, it was left in the grave, and covered over with earth." Years went on. lolo often* thought of the story, and endeavoured to engage some person to assist him in the search, but tho affair whs treated with ridicule. In the summer of 1789, lolo set upon the work silently himself, and in a few hours. "came upon the lost treasure, and he eventually succeeded in replacing it in its former position. Its whole dimension is 9 feet 'high, 19 inches width. Llantwit is considered one of the healthiest places in the kingdom and to corroborate tL is> the tombstones record great—almost incredible —longevities. There is a flat stone with ids inscription—Here lieth the body of Matth w Voss, buried 1584, a;tat 129." At Llaniuaca church, close by, there is the grave of I v.u Yorath, whoso death is thus recorded in T'IO parish church Ivan Yorath, buried a Sai ir- daye, tlio'xvii. of July, An. Dom. 1621. fctas. circa. 180. lie was a soldier in the light of Bosworth, and lived at Llantwit, and ho lived muche by fishing." On an old gable bell in the tower of Llantwit, there is tho following inscription :Ora pro nobis Sancte IItute." Boverton is by Lkntwit-thc Bovium of the Romans, where there was a station on the Julia Strata. Herein was the cattle of Jestyn ap Gwrgan, and after him the Fitzhamon f ily, and other Lords of Glamorgan. Sir John Guest purchased several of the old Norman dem< es, and the Bovertou and its old castles are a: pre- sent in the property of that family. Printed and Published by DAVID WALKINSHAW, a his General Printing Office, Corn 'Market It Pontypool, in the county of Monmouth.— Si'.turer.y 28, 1.86th

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.t

BEER AT THE SHOP.

THE "CIIIGNON" QUESTION.

DRUNKENNESS 4-T V ART EG.

NOTICES TO C^RRESPONDENTS.

CRICKET.

----- --------.+---SOGTH WALES…

A JEWISH MARRIAGE AT MERTHYR.

Family Notices

SHOWING UP THE MERTHYR TYDVIL…