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A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

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SIGNALLING AN EXPRESS TRAIN…

1 ANOTHER CASE.

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1 ANOTHER CASE. At Wakefield, Mr. Thomas Flocton, of Stockton-on. Tees, appeared to answer a charge preferred against him by the Great Northern Railway Company, of wilfully and without sufficient cause making use of the means of communication between passenger and rail- way servants. On the 9th of August the driver of the 10*25 a.m. express train from Leeds to London, when he had reached Sandal, some two-and-a-half miles beyond Wakefield, heard his gong strike, and on look- ing down the side of the train he saw a man gesticu- lating at a carriage window, beckoning that he would pull up at the next station. The driver went on until he reached Nostell, a short distance further. At this place the defendant alighted, and produced a ticket from Holbeck to Westgate, Wakefield, and said his 'intentions were to go to Kirkgate station, in the latter town, and finding that the train did not stop there, he thought he was perfectly justified in the step he had taken. As the express was leaving Nostell, a pilot engine came in behind, and there was the possibility that had the train been stopped outride the signals, a collision might have ensued. In defence, it was urged that Mr. Flockton had been telegraphed for to execute a deed, and as on previous visits to Wakefield he had been taken to Kirkgate station; he expected that the same course would be fol- lowed on this occasion. When he found that he was being carried out of his way, and being very anxious to get to his destination, he consulted his fellow travel- lers as to what he should do, and all being under the impression that the only result would be to bring the guard to them, it was considered that he was perfectly justified in touching the signal. Mr. Barratt, defendant's solicitor, complained bitterly of the insufficiency of the instructions in the railway carriage. The bench held that the case had been completely made out. The case being the first which had been brought before them under the Act they merely imposed a nominal penalty, which, including costs amounted to 50s.

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THE GROWTH OF SILK IN\ ENGLAND.

REMARKS ON VACCINATION.

HARVESTING CROPS INDEPENDENTLY…

IDARING ROBBERY IN A RAILROAD…

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THE LAND QUESTION.

THE TELEGRAPHS OF THE FUTURE.

WAS IT A LOAN?

THE HARVEST.

-_---UtistcIIiiitcoiis Ifntrlligcitte,

^etropitluu DssF.j

-------THE SCOTCH FORESTS.