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A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

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SIGNALLING AN EXPRESS TRAIN…

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SIGNALLING AN EXPRESS TRAIN TO STOP. At the Hertford County Sessions, on Saturday, Mr. Hayes, a gentleman residing at fiertingfordbury, appeared to an- swer a charge prefeired against him by the Great Northern Railway Company ef unlawfully signalling a train to stop without reasonable or sufficient excuse for so doing. The proceedings were taken under the Act 31 and 32 Victoria, cap. 119, which requires that there shall be provided means of communication between passengers and guards and drivers of all railway trains travelling 20 miles without stopping. It appeared from the evidence that on the 12th inst. the defendant left King's-cross by the 2'45 express, to Manchester and Liverpool, which does not stop till it reaches Peterborough. He should have got into a slip'' carriage placed in the rear of the train, which is dropped at Hatfield, at which place he wanted to stop; but instead of doing so he got into a carriage labelled Bradford," placed nearly in the centre of the train. Just after passing Hatfield, Mr. Hayes pulled the cord of communication which runs outside the car- riages, and the driver and guard, hearing the gong on the engine sound, looked round and saw him at the window of the Bradford carriage, making signs to the effect that he wanted to get out at the station just passed. The guard signalled back that the train could not be stopped for such a purpose, and the defendant by a gesture intimated that he was satisfied. Shortly after the train passed Hitchen the gong sounded again, and on its being brought nearly to a standstill the defendant got out. Mr. Hayes, in defence, said he could not find a "slip" carriage on at King's-cross, and got into the Bradford carriage under the impression made upon his mind by looking at the time table that the train stopped at Hitchin. The magistrates havirg consulted for some time, the chairman announced their decision. They were, he said, of opinion that the offence charged had been committed,—that Mr. Hayes had used the means of communication without reasonable and sufficient cuse. It ought never to be used except in grave and impor- tant circumstances, such as murderous violence, sudden illness, a carriage being found on fire, or other serious circumstances of a similar kind. As, however, the Great Nortkern Railway Company had no vindictive feeling in this matter, and as this was the first case of -the kind that had come before the Bench, they would only inflict a penalty of 5s. and the costs. I Mr. Webb said he was afraid that the public would infer from the amount of penalty that the magistrates looked upon the offence as a very light one. Mr. Oppenheim, (who appeared for the Company) said the remarks of the Bench were of more im- portance than the amount of the penalty. Mr. Cherry: "The Press will give publicity to my remarks." Mr. Hayes is to be prosecuted at Hitchin for stop- ping the train in that district.

1 ANOTHER CASE.

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THE GROWTH OF SILK IN\ ENGLAND.

REMARKS ON VACCINATION.

HARVESTING CROPS INDEPENDENTLY…

IDARING ROBBERY IN A RAILROAD…

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THE LAND QUESTION.

THE TELEGRAPHS OF THE FUTURE.

WAS IT A LOAN?

THE HARVEST.

-_---UtistcIIiiitcoiis Ifntrlligcitte,

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-------THE SCOTCH FORESTS.