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IMPERIAL p ARLIAMENT

AN OPIUM EATER IN THE WITNESS-BOX,

The TYLDESLEY FORGERY-SENTENCE…

THE "RIBBON OATH."

AN IMPUDENT SWINDLER.

EXTRAORDINARY ACCIDENT AT…

ANOTHER ACTION AGAINST A RAILWAY…

SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION OF…

NO MORE DISPUTES WITH " CABBY!…

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NO MORE DISPUTES WITH CABBY! A useful invention has been produced in Paris for settling disputes between cab-hirers and cab-drivers, which deserve attention. According to the account of it which a Paris correspondent has forwarded, the compteur m&janique," or calculating machine, not only reckons the distance traversed, but indicates as well the exact sum of money due to the driver. Two dials are fiiled on the back of the driving-seat; one contains a clock, while on the other the dis- tance travelled is indicated by a hand acted on by the wheels it is entirely beyond the control either of cabby or his fare.' The apparatus is put in and out of gear by the lowering and raising of a lever bearing the word libre," which is only visible when the cab is empty and the compteur" consequently unemployed. There is no danger of the driver omit- ting to lower this lever as soon as he is hired, it being evidently his interest to have the greatest possible dis- tance paid for while, on the other hand, it would be useles for him to try to make a fictitious fare by driv- ing about with the compteur" in motion, for a card in the interior of the machine registers the distance traversed during the day. and the money to be ac- counted for to the cab owner. The great difficulty has hitherto been to find a means of marking the time spent in visits, shopping, blocks in the streets, &c., when the wheels and the telltale are necessarily at a standstill. M. Bruet, the inventor of the new register, has now overcome this difficulty by an ingenious contrivance, by means of which, as soon as the wheels ceaseil to act on the indicator, the clock which forms part of the machine keeps the tell- tale hand moving at a rate which credits the driver with eight kilometres (about five miles) an hour, or 2 francs, according to the Paris tariff. The fares in Paris are low compared with those of London—viz 75 centimes (-Jd.) for the firbt kilometre (about two-thirds of a mile), and 25 centimes (2d.) for each succeeding kilometre. Taking a kilometre as two- thirds of a mile, it follows that, while the charge for the first mile is nearly the same as in London—1 franc 12 centimes, or lltd., against a shilling-the succeeding ones are very little more than half—viz. 17 centimes (3d.) against sixpence in London.

DISTRESSING AFFAIR NEAR ABERFELDY.

A COSTLY LIQUIDATION.

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THE CRACOW CONVENT CASE.I;

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IMPORTANT TO JOURNALISTS!

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AN INCIDENT OF RAILWAY TRAVELLING.

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THE" GAISOPHANER."

THE ANOMALIES OF OUR MARRIAGE…

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A VALUABLE RACE-HORSE!

EPITOME OF NEWS,

THE MARKETS.