Hide Articles List

25 articles on this Page

IMPERIAL p ARLIAMENT

AN OPIUM EATER IN THE WITNESS-BOX,

The TYLDESLEY FORGERY-SENTENCE…

THE "RIBBON OATH."

AN IMPUDENT SWINDLER.

EXTRAORDINARY ACCIDENT AT…

ANOTHER ACTION AGAINST A RAILWAY…

News
Cite
Share

ANOTHER ACTION AGAINST A RAIL- WAY COMPANY-DAMAGES £ 1,500. At the Manchester Assizes, the cause of Jel!v v. London and North-Western Railway Company" has been heard, and was an action for compensation. The plaintiff, in 1867, was a traveller for Messrs. Pieksley, Sims, and Co., agricultural implement makers, and on the 7th January of that year he was in a train on the defendants' line, when a collision occurred, and he was much hurt. An action was brought against the defendants after fruitless efforts at negotiation for compensation, and the cause was tried in this Court before the Lord Chief Justice in the August, 1867, when the jury returned the damages at £ 2,000; the Lord Chief Justice, however, thought the damage a little excessive, and medical testi- mony being that he might recover in four or five months, and the result was that, very much against the plaintiff's feeling and much against his will the compensation was reduced to 91,500. It appeared however, that the doctors did not turn out to be right, and he never properly recovered from the effects of the blow he had received, though able to take some employ- ment. So late as the early part of this year, h3 called to consult Dr. Erichson in London about symptoms resulting from the accident, though at the time he did not know they were the result of the accident, and did not tell the doctor he had sustained a rail wayinjry until asked. He was then obliged to walk with a stick, his right leg and foot having lost power. He was then employed as traveller for Mr. Northcote, of Ipswich, agricultural implement maker, and had a commission from Mr. Milburne, for his grass cutter. Mr. Northcote gave him £ 2 10s. a week as salary, and £ 6 a week for travelling expenses; and Mr. Milburne gave him ;1;;1 ius. salary ana i.6 lUS. travelling expenses. He also took some orders on his own account. On the loth February, 1869, he was again a passenger on the de- fendants' line from London, when, on the train arriving at St. Alban's, it dashed into a local train. This second collision was so violent that he was thrown forward on his head, and then, by the recoil of the train from the shock, thrown back again to the opposite side of the carriage. He was carried to an inn at St. Alban's, where Dr. Erichson was sent for from London to visit him. The doctor said he was so altered and prostrated by the shock that he did not recognise him. The spine was exquisitely tender and rigid, having so far lost its suppleness that when he turned he had to throw the whole body over at once. They could not get him out cf bed an attempt was made, but he could not stand. He was suffering from a spasmodic, barking cough, and a cough that was something between a hiccup and a deep sigh. This cough was de- veloped within half an hour of the accident. He bad never been able since the accident in February to get out of bed (he was brought into court on a kind of stretcher, and lay on bis back to undergo an examina- tion), and was constantly attended by a male nurse, who had to lift him about. He was partially para- lysed, and his legs had wasted, especially the right one. He did not think he would ever recover, but he might improve. His youth (34 years) was in his favour, but Dr. Erichson did not think it probable he would ever be able to walk again without support. Dr. Webster, and other medical men, were called in support of evidence as to injury, and for the defend- ants Dr. Watson Beevor, Dr. Noble, and a number of medical witnesses, were examined as to the possibility and probability of recovery, Mr. Justice Hannen, in summing up, commented on the undesirability of bringing plaintiffs who were so badly injured into court, to excite the sympathy of the jury, and remarked that on the last occasion it was said the plaintiff was brought into court under similar circumstances. He went very fully into the evidence as to the plaintiff's income, and said, besides recom- pensing him for loss of that, it would be desirable to give him something for the pain he had suffered. The jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff, damages 21,500.

SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION OF…

NO MORE DISPUTES WITH " CABBY!…

DISTRESSING AFFAIR NEAR ABERFELDY.

A COSTLY LIQUIDATION.

[No title]

THE CRACOW CONVENT CASE.I;

[No title]

IMPORTANT TO JOURNALISTS!

[No title]

[No title]

AN INCIDENT OF RAILWAY TRAVELLING.

[No title]

THE" GAISOPHANER."

THE ANOMALIES OF OUR MARRIAGE…

[No title]

A VALUABLE RACE-HORSE!

EPITOME OF NEWS,

THE MARKETS.