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IMPERIAL p ARLIAMENT

AN OPIUM EATER IN THE WITNESS-BOX,

The TYLDESLEY FORGERY-SENTENCE…

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The TYLDESLEY FORGERY-SENTENCE of the PRISONER. At Salford Assizes, on Monday, Henry Jackson, the late secretary and manager of the Tyldesley Coal Company, who had pleaded guilty to forgery, was called up to receive sen- tence. The prisoner had embezzled various sums, the pro- pi rty of his employers, amounting in the aggregate to about £ fi,000, and to conceal the offence he had made a number of falõe entries in the bank pass-book. The Judge said he very much regretted to see a person of the prisoner's situation and previous good character in the position in which he wae then placed. He was the secretary and manager of a highly-respectable company, and had the entire control of its funds, a large amount of which he embezzled in the first instance, and finally at- tempted to conceal the offence by committing forgery, which was an offence of a grievous nature. His counsel had adopted the proper course in advising him to plead guilty, because there were no circumstances in the case hy which be could possibly escape a It had been said on behalf of the prisoner that this was not a common case of forgery, the obj-ct not being to obtain money by means of the ins^ium«-nt that was for/ed. He (the Jmlg.) admitted that that, w;is so, but he could not overlook the fact that another offence had been previously committed. The prisoner had embezzled the money which had been entrusted to his chHrg-e, and to conceal that offence he had committed forgery. So far from the embezzlement being a cir- cumstance of mitigation, he looked upon it as an aggravation, because it showed that the pri- soner had been guilty of two crimes instead of one. Witnesses had been called to speak to the prisoner's previous good ch iracter, but he could nut look upon that evidence in the way of mitigation, because it was quite plain that that character had obtained for the prisoner the confidence of the share- holders and others connected with the company, and enabled him to abuse that confidence for so long a time. It was quite plain that that character was quite undeserved it only enabled the prisoner to abuse the confidence o 'his employers and escape de- tection for a certain time. He was not like an ordinary criminal whose bad associations, want ot education, and other causes, created compassion. In the present ca-e there was an absence of all those temptations, the prisoner being in a good situation, well provided for, and well educated. There was nothing in the case to induce him to look upon the offence as a small one, and, as a warning to others who held responsible situ- ations, the smallest sentence that he could pass was one of penal servitude for five year,s.

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