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THE TREATMENT OF PAUPER CHILDREN.,

FATALITY TO A ROOK-SHOOTING…

A BIRMINGHAM ROMANCE.

THE OASTLER MONUMENT.

MR. KICKHAM, THE RELEASED…

KCQUITTAL of YOUNG CHALONER…

BISHOP GOSS AT PRESTON.

WHAT WAR WOULD MEAN.

AN ACTOR ABOUT ACTORS.

FENIAN PRISONERS.

BIRDS OF THE GUANO ISLANDS.

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BIRDS OF THE GUANO ISLANDS. A writer in the New York Times, who, in a letter of several columns, tells the etorv of Life on a Guano Island," thus speaks of the feathered population in the country of his exile:- Among the chief objects of interest on Baker's I sland to a visitor are the birds, and they are well worthy of r-tudy. During the tirst night of my stay on this forlorn spot it seemed at times as if th« house were besieged by innumerable tom-cats then the tumult resembled the suppressed bleating of goats, and I heard noises as of bats grinding their teeth in rage; again it was the querulous cooing of doves and soon the chorus was strengthened by unearthly screams, as of ghouls and demons in mortal agony. But on going forth into the darkness to learn the cause of this infernal sere- nade, all was apparently calm and serene, and the radiant constellation of the Southern Cross, with the neighbouring clouds of Magellan, looked me peacefully in the fac., while from another quarter of the heavens the Pleiads shed their" sweet influence "over the scene. The most quiet time of night with the birds is about daybreak, when they seem to subside into "catnaps," preparatory to the llbours of the day. By day many of the birds range on tireless wing, over leagues of ocean, in quest of fish. But still the number of those that remain about the island is so great as to defy computation, and as you pass through their haunts, in some places they rise in such clouds as actually to darken the air above you, The eggs of some of the birds are of fine quality, and are much esteemed by the Americans as well as the Hawaiians on the island. Those of a bird called the nu-e ku are the most valued. This name is an imitative word, derived from the cry of this restless creature, and is applied to it by the Hawaiians, who have quick intuitions in onomatopoetic matters. In regard to moral character, the birds of Baker's Island may be divided into two classes- those which make an honest living, and those which are robbers. The gannet stands at the head of the respectable birds, and is a thrifty and honest citizen of the air. The re- presentative of the thievish class is the frigate-pelican, or man of-war hawk (tnehypetes aquilus). This bird has a dense plumage of gioomy black, a light, wiry body, that seems made for fleetuess, and winf's of eyen greater spread than the gannet's. Its tail is deeply forked, its bill is long, sharp, and viciously hooked. Audubon regards the frigate-bird, as superior, perhaps, in power of flight to any other. It never dives into the ocean after fish, but will sometimes catch them while they are leaping out of the water to escape pursuit. It is often content to glut itself with the dead fish that float on the water, but it depends mostly for a subsist- ence upon robbiug other birds. It is interesting to watch them thus occupied. As evening comes on these pirates may be seen lying in wait about the i-lands for the return of the heavily-laden fishing-birds. The smaller ones they easily overtake and compel them to disgor-ge their spoils but to waylay and levy black iiiail upon those powerful galleons, the gaunets, is an achievement requiring strategy and address. As the richly-laden gannet approaches the coast of his island home, he lilts himself to a great height, and steadily oars himself along with his mighty pit,ions, until he -ees his native sands extending in dazzling whiteness below. Nowsloping downward in his flight, he descends with incredible velocity. In a moment more he will be safe with his affectionate mate who is awaiting bis return to the nest. But all this time he is watched by the keen eye of the man-of-war hawk, who has stationed himself so as to intercept the gannet in his swift course. With the quickness of thought the hawk darts upon him, and, not daring to attack boldly in front, he plucks him by the tail and threatens to upset him, or he seizes him at the back of the neck and lashes him with his long wings. When the poor gannet, who cannot man- oeuvre so quickly as his opponent, finds himself pursued, he tries to buy his ransom by surrendering a portion of his fishy cargo, which the hawk, swooping down, catches before it has had time to reach the earth. If there is but one hawk this may be a suffleient toll, but if the unwieldly gannet is set upon by a number of these pirates he utters a cry of real terror and woe, and, rushing through the air with a sound like a rocket, in his rapid descent, he seeks to alight on the nearest point of land, well knowing that when once he has a footing on terra firma not even the man-of-war hawk dare come near him. The man-of-war hawk is provided about its neck and chest with a dilatable sack, of a blood-red colour, which it seems to be able to inflate at pleasure. On calm days, about noon, when the trade wind lulls, giving place to a sea breeze that gently fans the torrid island, these light, feathery birds may some- times be seen at an immense height balancing them- selves for whole hours without apparent motion on their outstretched vans. Whether they are able to in- crease their specific levity by inflating their pouches with a gas lighter than the atmosphere, or whether they are sustained by the uprising column of heated air that comes in on all sides from the ocean, is a ques- tion I am unable to answer. While floating thus, this bird has its pouch puffed out about its neck, giving it the same appearance as though it had its throat muffled in red flanneL

A COUPLE OF CLEVER DOGS!

EPITOME OF NEWS,

'1'HE MARKETS.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE…

A NARROW ESCAPE.

A VERY INTERESTING SUBJECT.

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