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rHE SAMOAN QUESTION.

-----------OPENING OF THE…

LETTER FROM STANLEY.

GERMANY AND EAST AFRICA.

CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES.

SHOCKING MURDER BY SAVAGES.

THE ATCHISON, TOPEKA, AND…

ANGLO-AMERICAN EXTRADITIONI…

the RED RIVER RAILWAY DISPUTE.

----._-------------NEW YORK…

--BtEW YORK WHEAT MARKET.

__--__----...-------BRECON…

[No title]

- !THE CRISIS IN FRANCE.

----------__--MR CHAMBERLAIN.

--------THE -,BLOOD TAX."

LONDON COUNTY COUNCI

-----------+-------------THE…

[ THE MUSWELL-HILL '1 IBURGLARY.

- ----------__--SERIOUS COLLIERY…

-._--------------------SHOCKING…

JACK THE RIPPER.

->---.-_-_.__--_----THE ALLEGED…

-------_---_.-----SUICIDE…

"-MORE STATUTE-MADE CRIMINALS…

THREE THOUSAND WOMEN ON STRIKE.

--____---__---ANrrI- V ACCIN…

AN ATHLETE'S SAD DEATH.

----_.-A SELF-IMPOSED TASK.

[No title]

THE WELSH COUNCILS.

MINERS' MEETING AT ABERDARE.

A MIDNIGHT BRAWL AT CARDIFF.

----RUFFIANLY CONDUCT AT CARDIFF.

SONS OF TEMPERANCE.—CARDIFF…

------__----JOHNS'S NEWPORT…

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT CARDIFF…

[No title]

SWANSEA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

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SWANSEA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. THE ANNUAL BANQUET. SPEECHES BY SIR HUSSEY VIVIAN, MR DILLWYN, AND OTHERS. SWANSEA'S POSITION AND PROSPECTS. MR STRICK ON THE IMPROVEMENT IN TRADE. The annual chamber of commerce banquet took place on Monday evening at the Mackworth Hotel, Swansea. Mr L. L. Dillwyn, M.P., tbe president, was in the chair, and he was supported by Sir Huseey Vivian, M.P., the Mayor (Alder- man Jones), Messrs G. B. Strick (chairman of the harbour trust), J. T. D. Llewelyn, E. Trubshaw (Llanelly), Councillors R. D. Burnie and F. Rocke, Mr Roger Beck, Mr J. Dixon (superintendent of the harbour), and Mr W. Howells, in the bcdy of the dining-room were about 70 other representatives of the commerce of the town and district. An admirably served dinner over, the President gave the loyal toasts. These were followed by the patriotic toasts proposed by Mr Dixon, and responded to by Major Pike. Major PlRB alluded to Lord Wolseley's recent sweeties, and said ho thought the Adjutant- General ought rather to have given Rome reason why the implements which were placed in the hands of our soldiers were so weak and so badly constructed that they would not stand the test of actual warfare. (Cheers.) If the Adjutant- General would not, he hoped their borough members would in their places in Parliament see if they could not discover the reason, and bring the officers who passed such weapns to book. (Cheers,) With respect to Lord Wolseley's advocacy of conscription, he said God forbid that the day should dawn when such a moda of raising an army would be adopted. (Cheers.) What had possession of his lordship to suggest such a thing passed his (the speaker's) comprehension. The president would tell them that last year the regiment he commanded made an application to Government for an increasein itsestabiishmo«t,but the reply was thattheGovernment was so satisfied with the numbers of the Infantry that at the present moment there need be no further increase, and therefore the application could not be entertained. That was sufficient to show them that there were enough people willing aud ready to come forward and serve the country without the necessity or conscription at all. (Cheers.) Mr IiocKf £ gave The Houses of Parliament," and begged to draw the attention of the members of the Lower House present to the necessity for Parliament taking up with vigour, and In a broad and generous spirit, the question of providing technical colleges. Ho showed the necessity for them, and suggested that they«bou!d be located and supported by the Government in centres which were the bead qunrters of special trades. Swansea being such a centre, he hoped a college of this kind would be located there. (Cheers.) Sir HUSSEY VIVIAN, Bart., M.P.. in response, after a few preliminary remarks, said: Although the attendance at the House of Commons has largely increased since my early days, I fear I must say the volubility of its members has also enormously increased, and consequently the work done has decreased. If constituencies would kindly subscribe to reward those members who don'c occupy the House by unnecessary speech- making, instead of rather encouraging this habit, a great deal of good might be done. (Hear, hear.) A cheap way of proving that a member is really living is by putting questions; and now these have grown to such length that they occupy an hour and a half of precious time. This is a very great abuse, and I would appeal to constituents to try and control their members and discourage them from wasting the public time in this way, (Cheers.) For my own part, I have always believed that the duty of a member was to speak when he had something to say which could really be of service to the great assembly, and bold his tongue when he had nothing to say which was of essential service to the House. (Cheers.) We want to get on with our business more rapidly than we do, and any means by which that can be effected will be welcomed by the House of Commons. (Cheers.) Alluditi" to tho remarks of Major Pike respecting the condition of our instruments of war, Sir Hussey gave his experience as chairman of a commission appointed to investigate the condition of naval cutlasses, and said by means of the f-p^dal measures now adopted at Enfield he believed all weapons were satisfactorily tested. Proceeding, he said The Government earnestly desired to put good arms in the hands of soldiers, and they are now in a fair way of doincr so. Our public manufacturing departments have not been in the hands of sufficiently practical men, but were under tho control of retired officers of the army. Tuese gentlemen are well instructed in their driil and other things, but not in the making of steel. To put a man brought up to drill to make steel is really not common sense; and then, after five years, just a they are learniug their business, they are superseded, and someone else put in their places. That is a thoroughly bad system, swi I do hOPd we arc getting out of ic UDW. (Cheers.) I quite agree with Mr Rocke as to the necessity tor technical education, but I want to impress this on yeu, and I put it even higher technical education, and that is the necessity of learning languages. If Eugiand is being beaten at this moment, it j' not io respect of technical education, but of our absolute ignorance as a nation of foreign languages. Your cannot push your com- merce throughout the length and breadth of Europe unless YOIl have efficient travellers, and you cannot got efficient travellers unless they speak a foreign language, (Cheers.) Foreign languagos should form an essential part of the education of every youth who aspires to rise to the higher rauks. (Cheers.) The PiiESlUKNT then gave the toast The County and Trade of Swansea." He compli. meuted the town on its new dignity, and expressed pleasure at knowing that the trade during the year had been better than ever before. The MAYOR, in response, alluded in detail to the improvements in towu which may be expected in the near future, especially emphasising the widening of Castle-street, the extension of the boundaries, the freeing ot tbe bridge tolls, and the abolition of the town and quay dues. He went on to say that the middle of the year would see the completion of the railway which would directly connect Swansea with the Rhondda Valley. When that line was finished, he looked forward to a time when the largo steamers thai, tak-5 tin plates from Swansea tu America would return with provisions which, by the aid of the new lino, Swansea peopie could distribute in the Khondda and other great centres of population. (Cheers.) Mr G. B. STRICK, chairmau of the Harbour Trust, who also responded, expressed satisfaction at the fact tbat the imports and exports of the port for the past year had exceeded those of the previous year both in volume and value. (Cheers.) He gave them last year bis reasons for saying Swansea was not in a position to compete either with Cardiff or Newport, so far as the exports of coal was coucerned. He could now, however, with some degree of pleasure point to the measures recently taken by the trustees for the purpose of facilitating the exports of coal, as well as provid- facilities for tho quick despatch of vessels coming to port. One of the greatest drawbacks in ship- pin at the North Dock had been the want of a uniform depth of water through which they could pass their veesels in and out of the lock every day of the year. But now the trustees were erecting pumping machines or the most powerful kind, and he trusted before three weeks had expired that thia machinery would be io fuli working operation. Then they would be abio to pass vessels of large tonnage and drawing 23ft. of water in and out every day of the year. Those remarks had no reference to the East Dock, which at all times bad ample depth for vessels of very large draught. There had also been a want of facilities for giving vessels quicker despatch when they came for bunker coal, which had been the fault of the railway companies rather than that of the trustees. Now additional accommo- dation was being provided, and soon all cause for complaint on this head would vanish. Mr Strick also alluded to the adoption of the electric light throughout the docks, warehouses, and offices, aed to the advantages which would accrue therefrom. Mr 11. D. BUBNIK gave the toast of "The Couuty Council" in felicitous terms, observing that it would meet a great want and tend largely to the efficient management of the county. Mr J. T. D. LLEWELTN, in response, said the county had much to learn in the way of administration from the county borough of Swansea. It bad to take over the working of a body which had done its work in the past without fear or favour and to the best of its ability, and he thought the newly-created body would prove aD. efficient successor. He firmly believed in the principle that had been enunciated in the new act that the ratepayers should be directly represented in the expenditure of their rates, and that the new county council would recognise that constitu- tional principle. He believed the council as consti- tutod was one with which the county might well be satisfied, and he did trust and hope there might be such a. balance of those who would regulate the business of the county as would prevent anything liko extravagance either in finance or politics. Mr BEOK, in an elaborate And able speech, gave the toast of the evening, and bore high testimony to the value and use of chambers of commerce. The PHJESIDENT, replying, said after the remarks of Mr Strick he need only say he was satisfied that there was substantial and material progress and advance in the prospects of trade, and we had every reason to believe that the improvement would be of permanent nature. He alluded to the agitations which bad been raised for getting a defensive station and a harbour of refuge in the Channel, and said of all the ports in the Channel Swansea was best adapted for both purposes. As to the harbour of refuge, he believed that, cheap or dear. the Mumbles Head was the best site anyhow. What oeuld be done there for thousands would cost hundreds of thousands at Lundy, and if one or the other were to be made at the same price,he believed the Mumbles would be the best. (Cheers.) He thought it would be worth the while of the people of Swansea to put their hand in their pockets and construct their own harbour at the Mumbles. (Cheers.) Mr WILHAM HOWEXJI also responded, and in the coarse of his remarks said tbat a* as the fruit6 of its labours the chamber was able to point, ) amongst other things, to a considerable gctension of the railway facilities, and to improved arrange- ments for tipping and siding accommodation, the completion of which would quite revolutionize the North Dock, especially when the Great Western Railway Company performed its promise of erecting a high tip. Then there was the abolition of the town dues, and of the bridge tolls, and the harbour of refuge quarter fir*t;taken up by thftchamber. Alluding to the cri-iiL.ou ul the Metal Exchange, he expressed the wish that the institution and the chamber might combine, and pointed cut the advantage which would accrue to the forujM1 from the charter and incorporation possessea&y the latter. i)o. The otjjer toasts were "The proposei by Mr Je' R, Leaver, and responded to by Mr Ernest Trubshaw, president of the Llanelly chamber' "Tbe Secretary," proposed by the president, and The Press, proposed by Mr T. P. Martin.

_._-------------IMPORTANT…

-----AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION…

THE SEE OF ST. ASAPH.

---------------.--. FATAL…

THE BARRY DOCK RAILWAY.

LEVYING BLACKMAIL ON ACTRESSES

[No title]

. SWANSEA.

NEATH.

LLANWRTYD WELLS.

TINBY.I

13

RHONEDA VALLEY. i

- BR^NMAWR.

NEWPORT.I

RISCA.

PENARTH.

CARDIFF.

IKEViEVV.

r LATEST MARKETS. I-

BARROW IRON TRADE.

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

----MUTUAL BENEFIT SOCIETIES…

[No title]

ANTICIPATIONS.

MANCHESTER JANUARY MEETING.

NEWMARKET TRAINING NOTES.

---------.---LONDON BETTING.

[No title]

FOOTBALL.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

----_---- --.-----THE GO-AS-YOU-PLEASE…

ALLEGLD THEFT BY A iPOXTYPRIDD…

" JOHN BULL AT HOME."

THE STRANDING OF THE NORMOND,

COLLIERY DISPUTE AT PONTY.…