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A HINT TO THE UNITERSITY COLLEGE.

IMORE POWDER THAN SHOT.

--------------SOUTH WALES…

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[No title]

THE LINER PORTS : WILL CARDIFF…

[No title]

LONDON LETTER. .

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LONDON LETTER. (FROM OXTR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.) [SPECIALLY WIRED.) LONDON, Monday^ight. What seemed at first sight an easy -matter enoogh, proves, on further consideration, to be a very difficult and complicated matter. I refer to the selection hy the Liberals of the aldetliiln for the London County Council. There ^many councilors who would make excellent men, and who, by circumstances of position, popularity, and ample leisure, seem naturally fitted fbr tbe higher honour. But this is a question .|rf which the several constituencies have something to say and with a fierce school board contest only recently followed by hard work at tbe county council election, the Liberal organisation are opposed to the creation of fresh vacancies, involving more expenditure of time, trouble, and money. A metropolitan constituency in which there is so little cohesion among the inhabitants and only partially developed local spirit, and where there are constant removals, is extremely difficult to work properly. Hence it is not surprising that the prospect of another election is not viewed with favour. It is true that there are some councillors who are willing to become aldermen,but tbey are not in the first rank, estimable men although tbey may be. Your readers must not be surprised therefore if nearly all the aldermen are selected from outside tbe council. The difficulty in doing this is that the Liberals may scatter their votes over too many nominations, while if the Tories vote solid, as they generally do, tbey may be able to cany most of the seats. A there are nineteen alder- men to be appointed, it will be seen that this is a serious matter. Both sides are holding meetings for consultation, but up to tbe present the Liberals have not been able to agree to any plan which will solve the difficulty. An interesting event has bken place within the last few days. Mr Edwin Chadwick, C.B., who may be described as the father of modern sanitary reform, has entered upon his 90th year, and is thus, happily, a living example of the advantages which accrue from a strict observance of the laws relating to health. He is still hale and vigorous in every respect, and as keenly mterested as ever in his favourite subject. It is nearly sixty years ago that he was called to the bar, but the practice of the law bad little charms for him. It was in 1828 that be first attracted attention to himself and tlie question of sanitation, in an article which appeared in the Westminster Review, combating the statements of a Government actuary before a Parliamentary committee, that, though the circumstances of the middle classes had improved, their U expec- tation of life bad not lengthened. Since then he has wholly devoted himself to questions connected with health and sanitation, and his labours have brought their reward, if not in honours, in the success which has attended his efforts. The conference on the law of libel to-day was, I am informed, of a very practical and cordial character. As I anticipated, it was resolved to make the association permanent, and to take full advantage of the powers given by the new act to prevent tha bringing of speculative actions. The union of the London and provincial press thus begun, might, with decided advantage to the pubiio, be extended in other directions. As time goes on, fresh fields for combined action will doubtless present themselves. The Irish police authorities, it is stated, have got wind of the fact that Mr O'Brien is announced to speak at Manchester to-morrow, and have taken steps to effect his arrest in the event of his keeping the engagement. As a matter of fact, Mr O'Brien, it is believed, has not left Ireland. Indeed, it would not be easy for him to do so, and it is announced to-night that Mr Dillon will take his place in the Midlands. The Loudon edition of the New York Heratd was to have burst upon the world to-day, and there was considerable curiosity to see upon what lines the journal was to be conducted. Unfortu- nately, however, it is announced tbat in conse- quence ot mechanical difficulties the publication has been delayed for a few This is not a very promising beginning but accidents will happen, and a few days' delay may whet tbe public appetite. Up to the present it must ba admitted the new papor has not been very extensively advertised. Our Customs system is, I hear, about to be iinprovsd. It has always baen a source of endless complaint, and in many instances not without justification. Should the proposed alteration become practicably, it will be welcomed byl travellers. The present plan of searching luggage I at the ports of departure and arrival invariably necessitates a long delay, especially to those who are hampered with a considerable quantity of luggage. By tbe suggested alterations this evil is to be obviated, and it is to be hoped that the intended establishment of a few customs dep6U at our great London stations will be exended and become general. I am given to understand that the London and North-Western and Midland Rail- ways are about to take tbe initiative in tho matter; premises will be erected to which an efficient staff staff of officers will be attached, and to this depot intending travellers shall ba allowed to send their luggsge several days in advance of their departure. In the meantime it will be searched for any duty-payable articles, and stamped with a seal which will carry it through to it destination without further search or trouble to its owner. With an improved system like this, it will, perhaps, be possible to prevent the "loss" of articles which under the existing regulations go astray under the most suspicious circumstances, never to be recovered. The earliest motion, and probably the first division after the debate on the Address, will be on Mr Bradlaugh's motion relating to perpetual pensions. Mr Bradlaugh informs me that Mr W. II. Sftiith has specifically agreed to find n opportunity a3 early as possible for tbe discussion of the motion. Mr Hanbury, M.P. for Preston, has consented to second, and a fairly large number of Conservative members have expressed themselves in favour of the resolution. It is requisite that vory strong pressure should be put on all members of the House, without distinction of party, to be in their places when the question is debated. This may be done by individual letters and ty resolution from clubs and oiganised bodies, or from public meetings. On tho re-assembling of Parliament, Mr Bradlaugh will at once ask the leader of the House to iix an eariy date after the conclusion of the debate on the Address, so as to give members ampla notice, and he will most certainly press tbe resolution to a vote. Mr Siunuel Plimsoll has consented to become one of the aldermen on the London County Council. This announcement will giva general satisfaction, not only at the return of Mr Plimsoll to publ:c life, but as an indication that his health is now aatisfactory.

MR CHAMBERLAIN AND THE LAND…

---------NORTHERN CONCILIATION…

MR W. O'BRIEN, M.P.

O'BRIEN DID NOT APPEAR.

COERCION IN IRELAND.

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THE PURSUIT OF DR TANNER.

---_------>------.---SWANSEA…

A SUSPICIOUS AFFAIR AT SWANSEA.

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RHONDDA VALLEYS MINERS' ASSOCIATION.

EMPLOYERS* AND WORKMEN'S ACT.

GLAMORGAN COUNTY COUNCIL:…

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[No title]

Family Notices

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A PARISH CHURCH DESTROYED…

[No title]

[No title]

THE SOUTH WALES UNION BANK.

ILOCAL BILLS IN PARLIAMENT.

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--U A CARDIFF CABMAN AND HIS…

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OFFENCES BY CANDIDATES.

THE YSTALYFERA ELECTION.—A…

YSTALYFERA DLVLSION.-MR BEYNON…

----'.,-._-GLAMORGAN COUNTY…

PEMBROKESHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL-A…

LETTER FROM A~LADY. -~ELli…

WHAT WELSHMEN THINK.

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