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[No title]

---------'--.---GOODWICK.

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Ii. NEWPORT, PEM.

LOCAL WEDDING.

SCLEDDY.

A COMMITTEE-ROOM COMEDY.

[No title]

I Lecture at Scleddy.

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I Lecture at Scleddy. MR. PYLE ON THE WORLD'S WHEAT SUPPLY. At the Scleddy Reading Room on Tuesday a lecture on The wheat supply of the world,' was given by Mr Pyle, of the Mount Pleasant Bakery, Fishguard. There was a large muster of members and lady friends present. Mr John Jenkins, builder, of Scleddy, who presided, briefly introduced the lecturer as one who could speak with authority on that important question. Mr Pyle prefaced his lecture by stating that he held no brief for any particular fiscal party, either Tariff Reform or Free Trade. The question of our food supply was one that should be raised above the mire of party politics. The question to be answered was how, in view of the increasing price of wheat, the supply was to be maintained at such a low price-level that all might participate without hardship. During the course of his remarks, the lecturer traced the wonderful growth of wheat imports from one and a half million sacks in 1849—the year that witnessed the repeal of the Corn Laws-to 26t million sacks in Igog. This wonderful increase was due to the increase in popula- tion and to the improved conditions of living. Contrasting the wheat consumption of this country and of America with that of other civilized countries, we found we were not the largest consumers. France, with a population of 40 millions, consumed 43 million quarters, whilst this country, with a population of 44 millions, only consumed 42 million quarters. This statement he supported by an extract from.a table complied by the U.S.A. Com- missioner of Labour showing the average weekly expenditure of each fanily on meat, fish and poultry to be:- In Great Britain, 5/4; U.S.A. 5/4t; Germany II lIt; France, 2/2i; Switzerland, 1/11 and Belgium, 2/0t. This difference could be largely attributed to the higher standard of comfort enjoyed by the working classes of America and this country. The lecturer also quoted facts and statistics concerning the consumption of rye in this and other countries, and an interesting description of the famous rye bread and Pumpernickel that so much has been heard and read of lately Continuing, he took his audience practically all over the world, des- cribing the various harvests, and time of harvesting, and giving descriptions of the wheat grown and when the wheat, as wheat or flour,arrived in this country. To what then could, he asked, be ascribed the present dear price of this universal commodity. Firstly, to increased consumption without a propor- tionate increase of wheat-growing acreage; secondly to shortage of supplies and thirdly to absence of stocks in this country. To-day other nations had come into the market in competition with us for the surplus of famous wheat-growing countries, China, Japan, and our African provinces, were buyers of wheat They, a decade ago, were not known as wheat-consuming peoples. Fifteen to twenty years ago the U.S.A. sent us 60 per cent of our foreign wheat now the demand there has been so increased that we can only obtain 30 to 40 per cent of our total imports from that country. In time, so rapidly was the rate of consumption overtaking the produc- tion, that country would soon require the whole of its wheat to feed itself. Tne crops of the Argentine, India, Australia, and Can- ada became to us yearly of increasing im- portance. In the last thirty years our wheat acreage had decreased by It million acres, or 44 per cent. Between 1878, and 1888 we pro- duced on an average 117 lbs of wheat per head, and imported 238 lbs; between 1903 and 1907 we only grew 68 lbs, and impor- ted 284 lbs. It was possible for tha botanist, the chemist, and the engineer for the home farmer to cater more for the home market, and thus to make it a little less dependant on the foreign grower. If all the wheat grown in Australia, Canada, and India were taken by the British Empire we should still be far from self-sustaining as far as cereals were concerned. Mr Joel James, in proposing a vote of thanks to Mr Pyle, briefly dwelt on the in- teresting aspects of the lecture, and the effect of new countries entering into the wheat market, thus restricting the foreign supply for this counrry. Mr Pyle had, he said, given an insight to the members into several new factors on food supply, and he hoped that they would have the opportunity of hearing him at Scleddy soon again (cheers). Mr John Jenkins seconded, saying that they had heard a lot lately of Tariff Reform and Free Trade, but that Mr Pyle's lecture was entirely unpolitical, and a keen insight in the world's food supply had been given them that nigh. Mr Pyle briefly responded, and a fine even- ing was brought to an end by the singing of the National Anthem." Next week the meeting will take the form of a debate. Mr Joel James will move that the House of Lords be abolished, and Messrs W J Morris (Ravel) and Charlie James will oppose.

DINAS CROSS.

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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

TO-DAYS POLLINIIS.

STATE INTERVENTION IN N.S.W.…

IN MEMORIAM.

LORD HIGH ADMIRALS.

Family Notices

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AN AUTOMATIC BOOKING CLERK.

A WELSH PASTOR IN AUSTRALIA.

THB I.IG-IT rr TYIE mFAL.

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North Pembrokeshire Farmers'…

ECHOES.

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