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GENERAL ELECTION, 1910

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GENERAL ELECTION, 1910 To the Electors OF THE County 23 Pembroke Gentlemen, You are again called on to select a Repre- sentative for the County of Pembroke in Par- liament. Having been adopted as the Conser- vative Candidate by the Conservative Council of this County, 1 have the honour to ask for your support at this Election. You have to consider a large number of questions of great potitical importance before you determine npon your representative, and I beg to place before you my viewa upon them. The House of Lords. I am opposed to the abolition of the Second Chamber or to such limitation of Power as will reduce us to Government by a Single Chamber. I favour such Reform of the House of Lords as shall limit the present hereditary right of a Peer to sit therein. I would support the extension to England and Wales of the representative system of the Peerage now in practice for Scotland and Ire- land. I desire to see the Second Chamber strengthened by the addition of Representa- tives, nominated by the Crown on the advice of the Government in Office, from those whcot in any class in life, have rendered eminent public service. Parliamentary Reform. I am in favour of the reduction of the dura- tion of Parliaments to five years of a Redis- tribution of the present Parliamentary Elec- torate, so as to secure a more accurate repre- sentation in the House of Commons of the will of the Country of a Reform of our Regls- I tration Laws and the removal of some Fran- chise Disabilities. The Church in Wales. I am opposed to the proposed Disestablish- ment and Disendowment of the Ancient Welsh Church. To disendow the Church is to take from her the funds now being properly used for the spiritual welfare of a large part of the Welsh people, and to devote them to worldly purposes. This would weaken the forces, at present inadequate, that are working for good in our land. I believe that the com- bined forces of Christianity are insufficient to make the nation as religious as thoughtful men desire to see it, and that to weaken one of them by taking away its funds will be an injustice to the Church and no real benefit to Nonconformity, or to Wales as a nation. Education. I am in favour of the right of the Parent to decide the daily Religious Instruction to be given to children I am in favour of such in- struction being given by teachers who hold the faith that they teach. The Budget and Tariff Reform. The action of the House of Lords has given the country the opportunity of deciding which of the two methods it will choose for raising the necessary Revenue. I think that the Budget will, if it become law, tend to increase Unemployment, to add to the burden of taxation of the Working Class, without benefiting them, and be in- jurious to the industrial prosperity of the Nation, and, far from reducing, wfll increase the difficulties in the development and acquisi- tion of land. I would support, in preference, the policy of Tariff Reform, because I believe that (1) It will increase our Industries by enabling us to make better terms with Foreign Nations for the entry of our Goods into Foreign Markets; (2) it will obtain the necessary Revenue from the Foreign Manufactured goods that come into this country: (3) it will, in so far as it does not obtain revenue, increase the demand for labour to supply the Home Market, and therefore reduce the extent of Unemployment in Great Britain. Colonial Preference. I believe that our Industrial Classes are benefited by the advantage which the Colon- ies are now giving to us by letting our Manu- factured Goods into twbir Markets at a lower duty than those of Foreign Countries. I be- lieve that these Markets will, in the future, become the great Markets of the World, and that it is of the utmost importance to us to retain that advantage. I would support any proposal for the re- arrangement of the existing Duties on Food, Drink, and Tobacco that would enable us to give a preference in return to our Colonies, provided that it does not increase the cost to the working man of the necessaries of life. I believe this to be possible, under the system of Tariff Reform, and that the people of Great Britain would be the gainers in the develop- ment of our Commerce to the Dominions beyond the Seas. I believe that this will unite all these Dominions more closely to the Mother Country, and that :it is vital to the future greatness and maintenance of the Brit!sh Empire. The Navy, The Maintenance of our Navy at a strength sufficient to make it impoasibie for the com- bination of any two European Powers to be superior in sea power to Great Britain is the. first duty of our Government. The Radical Government have failed to maintain this stan- dard and have thereby jeopardised our Naval Supremacy. If elected to Parliament, I should make the supremacy and efficiency of our Naval Forces my first duty. Old Age Pensions and Relief of the Poor. The continued payment of these is as cer- tain whichever Party returns to Office, as the payment of the Salaries of the Ministers of the Crown. I think that pensions should be extended to those persons, at present deprived of them, on account of Poor Relief, however small it may have been. I support the proposal to this effect, voted for by members of the Con- sertive Party on June 28th, 1908, and opposed by the Ridical Party in the House of Com- mons. A complete Reform of our Poor Law System is required, so that the afflicted and deserving poor may no longer feel that there is no remedy but the Workhouse for their misfor- tunes; honest poverty must be saved from association with the vagrant and worthless, as happens under our present Workhouse System. Agriculture. I would support any proposals that woulp increase the number of agricultural freeholders of land and that would enable occupiers of land to improve and develop their houses and land. The decline of agriculture and the popu- lation of the rural districts requires the im- mediate attention of Parliament the credit of the State, as has been the case in Ireland, should be employed to make advances to per- sons desirous of acquiring their holdings and for providing the necessary capital to improve land when acquired. Ireland. I am opposed to the grant of a separate Parliament to Ireland. Nothing that has occurred in recent years has altered the hostility of the Irish Nationalists to Great Britain and the Empire, or made it less disas- trous to entrust the Government of the loyal Protestants of Ireland to the control of a hostile Roman Catholic majority. Wales. The development and prosperity of Wales the growth and development of her towns, the success of her University, the improvement of higher Education, the cultivation of. her lan- guage and literature-with all those elements in Welsh National life, I am fully in sympathy. I do not think they would bo furthered by any movement that tends to create a political separation between her and the other Nations that form the Union. Having spent almost all my life in Pembroke- shire, I believe that I am in sympathy with the thoughts and ideas of Pembrokeshire men, and I welcome this opportunity of trying to serve them. Whether it be in Parliament or elsewhere, it will always be my desire to do whah I can for the good of those among whom I live, and if returned to Parliament, I should make that my chief aim. Trusting that you will favour me with your support. I remain, your obedient Servant, E. MARLAY SAMSON. Scotchwell, Haverfordwest, January 11th, 1910

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-. GENERAL ELECTION, 1910.…

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