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FISHGUARD.

JABES, CWMGWAUN.

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Sunday Sacred Concerts.

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Sunday Sacred Concerts. Sir,-Knowiii- your columns are open, im- partially, to the expression of opinions on public questions, I feel proud that Fishguard is blessed with a newspaper so conducted, I might venture to say on the lines of Pope's "Essay on Criticism Uilbiass'd, or by favour, or by spite, &c." You invariably givo to each deserving object its duo merit, and I crave a little space to express my indignation at the laxity displayed by the members of the Parish Council in granting the unconditional use of Penslade to a party of minstrels who, but for the timely intervention of our worthy keepers of the pure, simple religion upon which the honourable forefathers and mothers of our splendid Welsh race built their lives and ingrafted into their children. I shudder to think of what the introduction of Sunday I open-air concerts might have led to. Listen to the voice of the Master, "Remember the Sabbath-day to keep it holy." From the pulpit and platform I beseech our clergy and ministers to nip in the bud the pernicious, Pagan influence that threatens to weaken the birthright we inherited with the land of our fathers. Pass resolutions, they can never be too sweeping—none but the interloping" Sa-is" would have dared call a chapel resolution li sweepin.- "-where they seek to promote Sunday observance and prevent desecration. I. doubt not that in some respects new comers are beneficial to us, but if our Puritan Sunday is to be converted into a day of secularism then better far had we never seen them. Thou shalt not follow a multitude to do evil" we read in the second verse of the twenty-third chapter of Exodus. In this world we are placed as companions and assist- ants to one another; depending for most of the comforts of life on mutual intercourse and aid, and it is necessary that we should desire the company of our fellows of whatever nationality they may belong. But this sociability, like many other good principles, defeats its original purpose, causing much evil which, like other sinful liberties, spreads and grows, and the example thus set leads to iniquity. 1 cannot help seeing that the very lirst so-called "sacred" concert held at Fishguard a few Sundays ago was calculated to lead the in- habitants into the wrong path. That secular performance—I can term it nothing better- ought never to have been permitted because it was practically opening the door to the multitude to do evil in the sense, I mean, of diverting the people from public worship. We cannot expect the inhabitants of Fishguard to possess more firmness of mind than is ex- pected of others, yet no virtue is more neces- sary to the God-fearing Christian at the same time more difficult to put into practice. It is here the good example plays the essential part. If it were possible I would make Sunday cycling, for the mere pleasure of that exercise, punishable by law. I am aware that the use of the bicycle, by those who formerly had recourse to the horse-drawn vehicle, tends to diminish Sunday labour of subordinates. To the doctor on his round of succour to the Clergyman and minister, whose duties necessi- tate long journeys, the cycle is an indispens- able vehicle of usefulness that ought to be used whenever possible in the place of the convey- ances which entail Sunday labour, but for the gratification of our inclinations I say it is an example to the multitude to do evil. Too prone are we in these days to find apologies for indulging our waywardness. What would our Puritan parents have said to any company of strolling players who stuck up a bill an- nouncing the programme of a concert on the Blessed Day ? The very thought of it is enough to awaken horror in their pulseless breasts. The rich heritage they have handed down to us through centuries we must, as is our Christian duty, hand on unimpaired, en- hanced in power and influence, to generations that may yet come. We must throw our strength upon the side of its maintenance, band ourselves together and stand firm in the support of the Welsh Sunday as kept by those worthies who have gone before, combating those bad influences that are all too numerous in the manufacturing towns of the United Kingdom where the encroachments of enter- tainments, yea, even of sports, ar e wrecking lives by the thousand through the agency of Sunday being kept on the lines that are ob- served on the Continent. Had our Parish Council not been reminded by too timely resolutions passed at the chapels and the sensible letter of the Vicar, the "Pierrots" would have been given the unwise mandate to do just as they thought fit either during the week or on Sundays and, for the first time in the sacred and religious annals of Fishguard, Penslade would be the scene of gaiety and frivolity on the Sunday eve similar to the seaside of a Lancashire resort. I know of some in our midst full of complaint that our Sundays are dull and lifeless. This is the growth of a careless, selfish spirit which if not chocked, will spread more and more widely until our inestimable privilege is destroyed. So-called socialism" which, unhappily is endeavouring to And root, like tares of un- godliness among the wheat of religion and So&c!aZf-CSS' milch to answer for this, faith in ,,ls^°^ler name for unsettlement of ut nnn 1,/ii. adhercnts seek to set i, oil Divine command to "keep holy Sabbath." These arc they who, in the words of Canon Williams, at the church choral tt? .a^ Published in your columns, "wound Him in the house of His friends." Were they to set the example of attending church and chapel regularly they would find the habit grow upon them, inspiring them with lofty thoughts and imbuing them with the feeling that there is something more in life worth living for than pandering to self-gratification and worldly amusement. The knowledge that they have consecrated one day in seven to God would bring contentment throughout the six days of toil. Teach children, by example, not only to keep the Sabbath, but to love it as a day of devotion, of rest and of religion as our Welsh parents before us have kept it. Let us try to diminish the household work as far as possible so that our families may attend public worship. I know of several homes to day in which the routine work is reduced to the merest limits by the preparation of the food on Saturday. These are the homes wherein the true happiness of Christianity manifests itself; these are the homes of God- fearing parents and children who ever find solace in religion and the true observation of Sunday. There is no room here for the devilish tenets of socialism, of discontent, of deviation from the path of virtue, and the desire of out- door secular concerts under the name of "sacred. These are they who follow the path their forefathers trod, and who lind consolation in that grand old faith founded on the teaching of the Bible-book Divine. I congratulate the Parish Council in passing the resolution against Sunday meetings of any kind on I enslade, and I earnestly pray that any attempt, on the part of outsiders or new comers, be they Welsh or English, to hold such meetings will be put down with a firm hand. 'Tig region that can give Solid comfort while we live, lis religion must supply Solid comfort when we die After death its joys shall be Lastiug of eternity. Yours, &e., Fl D ELIS.

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NEVERN.

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Havarfordwdst Rural District…