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CHESTER MYSTERY PLAYS. *

NATIONAL SERVICE.I »

UDY ARTHUR GR0SVEN0R.

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THE REV C. A. GRIFFIN. ! +

CORRESPONDENCE.J

CHRISTMAS CAROLS.

SMALL HOLDINGS ACT, 1907.…

| CHESTER CASTLE BYE-ELECTION.…

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IMR. ASQUITH AND THE HOeSE…

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MR. ASQUITH AND THE HOeSE OF LORDS. TO THE BDITOB. Sir,-Alr. Asquith oomplains tliat what he calls "the will of the people" is liable to frus- tration at the hands' of a non-ropresentative body. This, however, is not true; nor. if true, would it be of the slightest importance, for the House of Lords is really representative, and expresses the mature and deliberate opinion of the nation far better than any mere accidental majority of the House of Commons. By a majority of thirty the lower House would have committed us to all the infamies and disasters of Home Rule; which, however, nine-tenths of its members detested in their hearts, and could never have been induced to sanction, but for their reliance upon the honour, courage, and patriotism of the House of Lords to interpose and prevent suoh disaster to the country. W'ha.t, indeed, was the very aim and object of that measure? What would have been its obvious and inevitable result ? Why simply to endow with supreme power men whose very footsteps Mr. Gladstone (26 Jan., 1881) de- clared to be dogged with crime. It was to en- throne the very men whom he had denounced, and imprisoned by hundreds, as "abettors and perpetrators of outrago"-men, who, he said, "had not been ashamed to preach a new and enlarged gospel of pluider" (7th Oct., 1881)- adding that "for the first time in the history of Christendom had these degrading and im- rroral doctrines been taught." Tho open and avowed object of Home Rule was to plaoe the government of Ireland in the hands of such men, men who had invented and inaugurated that system of terrorisation which Mr. Gladstone only too justly defined as "operating by fear of rum and starvation but which, wanting a further sanction, found it in murder and in murder only" (26 May, 1882). Well, therefore might Mr. Gladstone declare "It is idle to talk of law, or order, or liberty, or civilisation, 'f thes3 gentlemen are to carry through th; reckless and Vhaoiic schemes they have devised" (27 October, 1881) adding "Rapine is the first object; but rapine is not the only object. It is perfectly true that. these gentlemen wish to march thro-ugh rapine to the d siiitegrataon and dismemberment of \he Empire," and also saying "Hostility to Eiwrlsnd and Scotland is the motto and avowed frinciple of Mr. Parnell" (7 October, 1881). Well, indeed, was Mr. Gladstone justified in these denunciations. We find Mr. William O'Brien (1 October, 1901) speaking of the Irish as "disaffected to the core, and only need- ing the arms and training of the Boers to tes- tify their hatred of English rule." Mr. John Redmond added, "We are prepared always to take up yrms in Ireland to effect our free- clom"; declaring also that "Irishmen were united in hostility to England." No less explicit was Sir William Harcouit in denouncing this detestable w Icked-iom6 v. iT.ch he declared was "a vile conspin. y whose authentic doctrines were those of treason end assassination'' (3 March, 1881). From all thes? àisa8te, dangers, infamies and d.iMTaoes-frcAr. the certain and irretriev- able ruin of our country—we owe our salva- tion to the House of Lords, and the House of Lords alone. Does Mr. Asquith think we f going to abandon this great safeguard at our rights, our libert.es, our national exist- ence? Does he think we are going to do so, when we have received such i-n object lesson as to its prioress value? Does he think, in the language of Mr. Gladstone (27 September, 18'il,) "that we are gding to disintegrate the great capital institutions of the oountrv for the purpose of making ourselves ridiculous in the sight of all mankind ?" Does Mr. Asquith imagine we are going to do this for the pur- pose of placing uncontrolled power in the hands of a øet of poiiticaJ profii,gates, who joined hands with "the abettors and perpetra- tors of outrage"—the men "woo wish to march through rapino to the dismemberment of the E-ii-pire"-the men "whose avowed motto is hostility to England"—the men who have inaugurated "the boycotting that finds its sanction in mu-der, the men whose authen- tic doctrines a.re those of treason, assassina- tion" ? o, Let Mr. Asquith understand that. in the language of Sir William Harcourt (7 Dec., 1885), we shall leave such men in the company "of their Fenian allies," and to "stew in their Parneliite juioe till they stink in the nostrils of the country" !—I am, etc., CHARLES FELLOWS. Old Bank Chambers, Wolverhampton.

FRODSHAM SESSIONS. ♦

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