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THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

CONTINENTAL EXPERIENCE OF…

RENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS.

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RENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS. A paper presented at a meeting of tho Royal Statistical Society by Mr. Robert J. Thomp- son, on "The Rent of Agricultural Land in Elngland and Wales during the 19th Century," lots a little light into some absurd stories of the gains of. "bloated" landlordism which are capable of being much discounted. The paper was based on statements obtained for the pur- pose from a return of entates, as well as on other available records. The average rent of 70,000 acres during each year of the nineteenth century, of 120,000 acres from 131-5 to 1900, and of 400,000 acres from 1872 to 1900 was shewn. A careful comparison of the records of rent with the ;nooine tax returns and with prices led to the conclusion that the average rent of t grioultural land in England and Wales in 1900 was 34 per cent. below the maximum of 1877, 30 par cent, below the level of 1872, and 13 per cent. below the figure of 1846. The average Tent, of farm land in 1900 appears from these returns to be about 20s. per acre. This is subject to charges for repairs, improve- ments, etc., and many other expenses, which amount, on the average, to 35 per cent., so that the nett rent, after payment of charges, probably avi rages some 13s. per acre. Moreover, besides payment for the bare soil, rent repre- sents a payment for the landlord's capital in- vested in he farm in the form of buildings, fences, drainage, etc. This, at a very moder- ate estimate based on actual facts, was said to average not less. than £ 12 per acre. Interest on this at 3 per cent, amounts to 8s. 5d., and when this is deducted from the nett rent of 13s. per acre it leaves only 4s. 7d. per acre as representing on the average the rent of the "naitural and ind?structible powers of the soil" and the advantages of position; that is the "economic" rent as distinct from interest on capital. Mr. Thompson concluded by sug- gesting that it is in a return to the conditions of earlier times, to a more evem distribution of the land, in a larger number of holdings, that we may perhaps anticipate more profit- able results from the utilisation of the soil. Tho medium farm, with a reasonable propor- tion of still smaller holdings, favours and en- courages the growth of those products which can be produtKd as cheaply and as well in this oountry as abroad.

i PLOUGHING, HEDGING AND DITCHING.…

CHRISTMAS STOCK SALES. +

XMAS COUGHS AND COLDS. +

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I"NO TESTS FOR TEACIIERS."

EDUCATION IN WIRRAL.

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----_._---A HARE STORY. +

WORKHOUSE EXPEiVDITUUE. t

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