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ROYAL ADIEU.

LORD KELVIN.

PLATELAYER KILLED.

ATTACK WITH A HAMMER

SHREWSBURY SCHOOL CAXTON.…

THE REV. G. U. ROBINSON. *

CHESHIRE CHEESE FAIRS. 1

FOLKESTONE MEETING.

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WIRRAL DISTRICT COUNCIL.I…

THE BRITISH NAVY. +

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THE BRITISH NAVY. + LAST Y.M.C.A. LECTURE. The last of tho Y.M.C.A. course of lectures in the Musio Hall was given on Monday even- ing by Mr. Frank T. Builp-n, on "The way they have in the Navy." A large audience assembled under the presidency of Mr. Robert Yerburgh, who was cordially cheered on his appearance on the platform. Mr. Bullon is widely known both as a lecturer and as a writer of sovcral popular books, and on the present occasion he certainly did not belie his reputation as an en.- tertaining speaker. The Chairman said he was there in what was to him a very pleasing capacity. He wanted to emphasise the point that he was not there to introduce the lecturer, because Mr. Bullen re- quired no introduction from him. He was far too woll known. He had won himself an im- portant place in our literature. His works were standard woiks, and they were doing for the merchant service what Capt. Marryat's works had done for the Royal Navy. Picturesque and vivid in their descriptions, they had put before people the -conditions of those who followed the merchant servio?, and the perils they had to encounter, and everybody who was interested in the country know what the merchant servioo: meant to us. Mr. Bullon had not only devoted himself to writ.ing about the merchant service, but he had given his great talents towards fur- thering the well-being of the men who wero engaged in tho service. Thureforo that night they welcomed him not. only as a great writer, whose works gave readers the greatest delight that was possible, but as an Englishman who was doing his very best to advance the well- being and interest of the English merchant ser- vice. In introducing his subject, Mr. Bullen ex- plained that lie had served 16 years in tine merohant service, and he then had all those prejudices obtaining in the mercantile marine against tho Navy. Those prejudices existed because tho men in the mercantile marine looked upon the mpn in the Navy as Prince Bismark was said to look upon t'he people of England, namely, as being "too comfortable. He left the mercantile marine in 1882, and in 1897 he had the inestimable privilege of being ap- pointed a special correspondent of a London newspaper to attend the autumn manoeuvres of the Navy. In one month he was about the most bigoted convert they ever saw to the many virtues and the extraordinary excellence of tho men of the Navy. (Applause.) The lecture was illustrated by a number of excellent lantern slides, commencing with a picture of Lord Nelson, and shewing by the contrast of ships suoh as tho Victory with the Dreadnought and other modern battleships, the enormous de- velopment that has taken place in sea warfare. Mr. Bullen pointed out one peculiar fact in connection with the development of armaments, and that was as weapons became more terrible and powerful the death roll in battle decreased. At the battle of Le Panto, when Don John of Austria settled tho question whether Europe was to be Christian or Mohammedon, 80,000 men had perished, whik* at tlie recent battle of Tsushima, where one ship was equal to a whole fleet in tho days of the battle of Le Panto, the casualties had amounted to only 5,000. Mr. Bullen mentioned that he had recently been through tho Dreadnought, which he described as "that gigantic congeries of wonders." He said it was difficult for even Naval men to realise all that the Dreadnought meant, but tho tremendous fact was that the Dreadnought waa in oommission thirteen months from the time her keel had been laid. He often wished the taxpayers could look upon the wondeis of the Navy, and see what great value they were getting for their money. There was now at tho head of affairs a man who had caused the greatest 'opposition. There had orrtainly been a revolution within the last few years, and some people considered it was too early to judge the entiro effect. It was not too early to judge of tho fleet in being, or of tho effect produced among fore-ign nations of the marvellous change. When even the Admiralty had failed in their duty and started to do things that were absurd, ho had been an advocate of "going for them," as the Navy League had dona in times gone with great success. The Navy League had done things wiser than that. When they had found the Admiralty wore doing the right thing, the League had done- the right thing. and had left tho Admiralty alone. (Applause.) Before the commeucemait of the lecture ex- cellent selections of inuaio were provided by Mr. H. E. Crane's baud.

£ 605 AN ACRE. 1

ALLOTMENTS IN NEWTON.

HUNTING. +

SIR W. W. WYNN'S HOUNDS

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