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MR. BARNSTON'S CONFIDENCE.…

-----STOP PRESS,

A VICAR'S VALUED ADVICE.

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FLINTSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.…

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HAWARDGN'S EIGHT SCHOOLS.…

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CHESTER CATHEDRAL.I

NEW INCE VICAR.

VOLUNTEER LONG-SERVICE MEDALLISTS.…

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MALPAS RURAL COUNCIL. ! ——j

ROSSETT COCOA-ROOMS DISPUTE.…

RECTOR'S DAUGHTER DROWNED…

HAWARDEN SESSIONS. 6

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MR. BARNSTON'S CONFIDENCE.…

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unfortunate thing was that we were losing soma of our best workmen. It was only the thrifty, who in prosperous times saved money, who were able to pay their passage abroad, and it was only the skilled workers, who know they could command good wages in any country, who dar?d to go out. The position of Germahy wae dilfeient. In 1881 the returns shewed that 220,000 people emigrated. About that time Prince Biernarek altered the Fiscal system of the country, with the result that although Ger- many's popu!ation had increased much faster than our own, Germany sent abroad in 1903 36,000 people, compared with our 262,000; whereas in 1904 271,000 people left this country, only 28,000 left Germany; while in 1905 German emigrants numbered again 28,000, against our 260,000. When one con- siderted the number of men who were leaving this country every year, and when one con- sidered that in every great ceaitre of industry there was a Large amount of unemployment, which would continue through the winter, surely it was wise to see if the time had not come for some reform in the Fiscal policy of this country. (Cheers.) In conclusion, Mr. Barnston said that he was going into different parts of Eddisbury every week, and every day ho felt more and more confident that there was victory in store for him when the time came (Loud ohoors.) Ho believed the votaro of this country had found out the Government, and were sick of their promises, and ha believed the Unionists would go into the battle united, and he ventured to think that when the battle was ovtci." tfntei victory would be theiirs. and ho should have the honour of being their member in the next House of Commons. (Loud cheers.) Mr. Thompson, in the course of a short speteoh, mentioned that that was his first visit to Cheshire after an absence of 43 years. Speak- ing on Tariff Reform, he. oaid the foreigners sent us patent medicines to poison us, Belgian spades to dig our graves, Swedish coffins to bury us in, audi German pianos to play the "De.o., March" over us. (Laughter.) We not only got their surplus products, but their refuse in the form of alien immigration. (Hear, hear.) That being his last meeting, Mr. Thompson acknowledged Mr, Prichard's kind- ness tow-aids him. On tho motion of Mr. Randies, seconded by Mr. Nixon, a vote of thanks was accorded the speakers. A similar compliment was paid the chairman. A public Unionist meeting was held in the Primitive Methodist Schoolroom, Coxbank, Aud- lem, on Thursday evening. Mr. John Hobson, of Moss Hall, presided, and was supported by Mr. Harry Barnston and Mr. P. Thompson, of Gateshead. Thero was a large attendance, among those present being Messrs. J. Hulse, F. Shaker, T. and A. W. Whietom, T. Emberton, S. Lewis, J. Vaughan, G. U. R. Boeston, W. Pureell, J. Fisher, P. Griffiths, G. Gibson, P. Moseley, C. F. Priobard (central agent), etc. Mr. Barnston, to whom all listened with great attention, spoke on the principal topics of the day.—Mr. P. Thompson spoke on the evils of Socialism and the necessity for Tariff Reform. —A vote of thanks to the speakers, proposed by Mr. T. Emberton, seconded by Mr. Samuel Lewis, concluded a successful meeting.