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MR. BARNSTON'S CONFIDENCE.…

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MR. BARNSTON'S CONFIDENCE. ♦ "THE VICTORY WILL BE OURS." SPEECH AT SIIOCKLACH. If 0110 thing more than another shews how fcound is the progress of Unionism in the Eddis- bury division, it is the excellent, support which ldr. Harry Baraston obtains at his meeftungs on the most wretched of nights. Nothing could be more unfavourable than the weather on Friday eveiling, yet Mr. Barnston could hardly have had a more successful meeting than had at the aohools at Shocklach. Mr. John Howard, of Broughion Hall, presided over an ^Othaaiastic audience, aind on entering the room Mr. Barnston was heartily chcercd, and when he appeared on the platform and when he rose to speak the demosnst.ration, was repeated. Among others on the platform were Mr. P. Thompson, of Gatedbead (of the National Union of Oomaervative and Constitutional Aasooia- ^ttons), Mr. J. L. Randies (Tilston), Mr. Thos. Nut an acd Mr. Joseph Piggobt. Among others Pl%eot were the Rev. G. and Mrs. Matthias. Kiss Barnstoei, Me-ssrs. Joseph Leo, A. Evans, W. W. Buckler, W. Hughes, J. Davison, T. Price, S. Nixon, R. The 1 well, W. Erans, Jas Bough, K. Ferguson,- C. Tomlinson, Piggott, junr., C. F. Prichard (agent), cto. The Chairman, in introducing Mr. Bamstan, said that his family and himself were as much respected as anybody could be. Mr. Bains ton 'W'afi coming forward in their interests, and if they aocepted him, they would have a member ¡ whom they could all trust, although such a, man Was not so common in those days. (Laughter.) lIe thought they were all tired: of the present Government. They hod waited very patiently, and they had looked at the captivating pictures of big loaves. It had gesaerally ended in their having to pay more money for the little loaves. Coal had become more expensive, and if they looked across the water they found the state of the whole of Ireland was very sad. The Government took no steps to rectify that con- dition of things, a.nd Mr. Birrell, who could do Bomethin.gr, did not stir. (Hoar, hear.) WHAT RADICALS FEAR MOST. Mr. Barnston, in acknowledging the oordi- ality of his reception, took the opportunity of wishing everyone a very happy Christmas a.nd a bright and prosperous 1908. It was pleasant to him to see so many before him on that awful ttight, and it was pleasant to see so many old friends and to hav3 their old friend and neigh- bour, Mr. John Howard, as chairman. (Cheers.) Going into politics, Mr. Barnsrton, referring to the last election, said the principle on which the Radicals seem to have gone was that of "Get votes; get them honestly if you can, but, e.t any rate, get- them." (Laughter.) It was no Wonder that the Radical party realised the very Worst, thing that could happen to them would be a generaJ electino, because they knew they would not in any way repeatl their victory. They would, in fact, be well beaten, and he I himself would like to have an election in Eddis hairy- to-morrow. (Cheers.) Referring to the 4Lttaclc on the House of Lords, Mr. Barriston Pointed out that any Radical speech might be divided into two parts. In the first part, the Hadioal speaker would tell them of the Tjoiidei- ftil things which the Radical party had done. lIe would never touch on those lovely promises, none of which had been fulfilled; he would have been a fool to do so. He would tell them that 'tho Radicals had done more as regarded legisla- tion than any other Government of modern times. He (Mr. Barnston) had noticed that, Mr. Stanley had pointed out that very fact the other tUght. Then there was the second part of the •Radical spcech. The speaker always told them the same thing. He said that owing to the tirefckdful Hous of Lordis all pifogress was etopped, and the barrier of the House of Lords must, be done away with. Any intelligent per- "°n must see that those two statements could t possibly stand together, becai-ise they were diametrically opposed to each other. (Hoar, If, an the one hand, the Radical party passed all those wonderful measures, what "appened to that dreadful barrier of the House Of Lords? If, on the other hand, the bonier <30ci*st, -what happened to all their wonderful ^asiuicis? it, must- be perfectly obvious to any 0j }jac] aQy logical capacity at Oil, that those statements were mutually de- structive. (CSheers.) Mr. Barnston pointed out that the House of Lords were necessary to placet the country from somte temporary majority in the House of Commons. It was not always the House of Commons who represented the will of the people; and that was proved by ths history of the Home Rule question. (Hear, hear.) It was difficult to nefer to the present •Ministry at ail as a Government, because they Were about the MOST INCAPABLE GOVERNMENT which we had had in modern times (Cheers.) They were incapable, because the business of legislation had bcc-n hopelcsdy mis-managed, amd because the task of governing was con by the -Radical party to consist, in pall- ckring to the forces of mis-rule and disorder throughout the British Empire. They were in- satiable in the second place, because they had ^Ganaged to break overy promise which they had made to the electors at, the last general election, and they were incapable because they had a record of measures ill-oansidered, ill- contrived, inspired apparently with the one idea, as far as possible, of setting class against class, and creed against creed. If there was 0Q0 wicked thing in this world to-day it was to IIet man against his fellow-men and to set class fcgainat class, and still wol,,q3 to set erred against oreed. The Government were incapable also h^causie, in order to hide tlieir lamentable failures and to cover up their promises, which y could not perform, the Prime Minister, Su Henry Oampooll- Bannerman, had announced that, bofono they could fulfil their pledges, and before they could carry out what ho was pleased to call thoir mandates, they must begin by pull- '49 down the British Oonsti-tutkxn, and then Parting to try to build it up again. As their ^hail-man remarked, if one thing more than •Qother shewed the incapacity of the Govern- tnent, it was the deplorable condition of poor **e*land. The Government had admitted through h.eir Irish Secretary that when they had gone fcrto office they had found Ireland in a perfectly ul condition; whereas to-day, as every- body knew, tho country was in a state of tur- bulent illegality. (Hear, hear.) One oould not up a single newspaper without finding the odious system of cattle-driving was •"aiupant throughout the country. He did not "kittle people in Cheshire realised the awful no.vs what was taking place. Miserable farmers, loyal, peaooablie men, poor email holders, just as honest and loyal, wero being subjected to Wretched persecution, which would not be *oleratod in any civilisied country for a moment. \*°w, we knew that sort of tiling oould be put c**wn, because it had been done before. It J*>uld be stopped by putting into operation the jinxes Acts. The Radical Irish Secretary had v011-' very little. He had prosecuted a few men, they were only a few dupes and corner boW, who had probably been led on by others. to the real offenders, he was so frightened ~y the eighty Irish Nationalist members in the that, apparently, he took no notice of tk^rn' fLnc^ 1*>u&(,d to prosecute them and bring country into that ordinary etate of law and which was surely the- heritage of every- belonging to the British Empire. (Cheers.) he awful, hopeless, helpless state of Ireland the utter incapacity of the Government, owre were people in that, country just as honest people, in Cheshire, who were suffering in a that was AN ABSOLUTE DISGRACE oivilised country. (Hear, hear.) The ^^oais-t party were absolutely pledged to sup- the horretst Protestant minority in Ireland, d' hand them over to the dishonest and Sboyal faction. (Choers) Turn ing to the stion of Fiscal Raform, Mr. Barnston 6aid would put a few facls before them. In the j* place they were told that the country was k*1 state of the greatest prosperitj-. There had ? undeniably a sequence of good years of Ooy10' an< 'ho Radicals said country had ■y.01 beien so prosperous. At the very time Woi'e- making those s'tatemc-nls, there was °<>u'p 6l,1PPOS(K'> a single important town W0r^Cli which was not, devising schemes to make to]^r tho unemployed. Tliey were also food of the blessings of free ooulj ^Ulwl.pd a delightful thing, and if he So ffu^ ,roc toeid to-monx>w he siiould do so. 'wham 'tRW, there were only two places this could get free food; one place was tor.) a+ ar><^ the other was gaol. (Laugh- Present time, uadetr this Free Food Radical Government, the taxpayers were paying aixty-six millions CV year in taxes on food, drink and tobacco. Again, they were told of the bleesingr, of Free Trade. If we had Free Trade be was perfectly certain it would be the best system, but when Free Trade was talked about, they should remember there was not a single man in that room who could eeaad anything to & foreign country without paying a duty of at least 25 petr cent. (Cheers.) He wondered whether people realised when they were told the country was having that great wave of prosperity that our best workmen were leaving this country in greater numbom every year. They would agree that in estimating un- employment it was absolutely essential to keep in mind the importance of the Emigration re- turns. In 1898 the number of men who left the country was 140,000. In 1903 it ran up to; 262,000, in 1904 to 271,000, and in 1905 to 260,000. If we were losing the "AVeary Witiaes" and "Tired Tims," it would not matter, but the

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MR. BARNSTON'S CONFIDENCE.…