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CHESTER TEACHERS. +

WINTER BRINGS ECZEMA. +

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BOUGHTON WOMEN UNIONISTS.…

ALLEGED BICYCLE THIEF.

CHRISTMAS POSTING.

UNIONIST SUPPER If,

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EATON YEOMANRY SQUADRON. 1—-

A TATTENHALL TRAGEDY. 0

THE LATE REV. W. LUTENER.…

CRIMEAN VETERAN'S DEATH. e

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CRIMEAN VETERAN'S DEATH. e SHOTTON'S GRAND OLD SOLDIER. There passed away at Hill Cottage, Shotton, the house of his daughter (Mrs. Stewart), last week, in his 88th year, Thomas Rugman, who for over twenty-two years served his country as a soldier in various parts of tho world. Ho was a native of Thornbury, Gloucester, and joined the 30th Regiment of Foot (now the East Lancashire Regiment) in Castlebar, Ireland, in 1846. His regiment, after being stationed in Gibraltar and in other parts of the Mediterranean, was one of the first to proceed from Varna to the Crimea, and formed part of the Second Division under General Sir do Lacy Evans at the Alma. He was also one of the advanced pickets first attacked by the Russians on the morning of Inkermann, and was present during the whole of the siege of Sevastopol, serving in the trenches. He was the proud possessor of the Crimean medal, with three bars, bearing the names of Alma, Inker- mann and Sevastopol, and it is interesting to note that on the occasion of Field Marshal Sir George White's visit to Liverpool to unveil the King's Liverpool Memorial, the old warrior was conducted to Liverpool, where he was introduoed to Sir George White. It was one of the proudest moments of his life, being, as he was, among many who had endured the same hardships as himself during the terrible wars of those days. When Sir George noticed the old man's medal and bars he said, touching them, "Your medal is worth my fifteen!" It was the delight of the old warrior to repeat this when relating the incident. Until he grew too feeble to move about, it was his custom on the anniversaries of Alma and Inkermann to visit St. Ethelwold's Schools and relate to the children the incidents of those battles. There was a sense of realism which a book could not supply in listening to the story of the regiments bursting through the vineyards of the Alma; of the narrow escape of Prince Menschikoff, the Russian commander-in- chief; of Captain O'Brien listening to the tramp of the grey-coated Russians in the fog on the morning of Inkermann, using a ramrod as a sound conductor; of the sailors' dragging their guns a distance of seven miles and going into action "like a lot of schoolboys"; and of the terrible privations and harships of both men and horses before Sevastopol. After the closo of the Crimean war he, with the remainder of his regi- ment, returned home and volunteered for service in the Royal Canadian Rifles, leaving his own regiment in Dublin in 1858. He was finally dis- charged from the latter corps at Kingston, Ontario, in 1868. His discharge bears the fol- lowing endorsement:—" His conduct has been very good, and he is in possession of four good conduct stripes." Mr. Rugman, until a few months ago, enjoyed good health, with the ex- ception of a rheumatic affection of the lower limbs—a relic of the Crimean campaign. Some two years ago Captain Hurlbutt endeavoured, but without avail, to get his small pension in- creased, and the high-water mark of his country's generosity did not rise above ls. Ojd. per day. The funeral took place at St. Deiniol's Church- yard, Hawarden, on Thursday afternoon, and partook of a semi-military character. As the deceased was an old inhabitant, the obsequies were largely attended by the old inhabitants. The funeral procession was headed by the senior boys of St. Ethelwold'a School, marching two deep, followed by a military escort under the charge of Lieut. Gould and Sergt.-Instructor Hill. Captain Hurlbutt was unavoidably absent, but sent a wreath. Preceding the coffin were two who had shared the perils of the Crimean campaign—Sergt. Ryan, late 17th Lancers, "D" Troop, who rode in the Light Brigade charge, and Staff-Sergeant Spivey, of the Grenadier Guards. The bearers were the following old soldiers, all wearing medals:—Sergt.-Major Holden, C.-S. Jones, C.-S. Thomas, Sergeant Courtney, Sergeant Eaves, Private S. Morris, and J. Brooks, A.B. The chief mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. T. Rug- man, Mr. and Mrs. S. Williams, and grand- children. The coffin was covered with a Union Jack, on which was placed the tunic and head- drees of the Royal Canadian Rifles. Among others present in uniform were Sergt.-Major Claridge, Q.M.S. Haswell, Cr.-Sergt. Peel, B.S.M. Kelly, Sergis. H. Jones, J. Bailey, F. Baird and Lloyd. Messrs. Fitzpatrick (Inland Revenue), Marriott (Customs), W. II. Fox, T. Guest, S. Vickcrs, W. Marrow, E. Taylor, J. Ellis, S. Lloyd, and others were in the procession also. The service was conducted by the rector (Canon Drew). Mr. R. W. Pringle presided at the organ and accompanied the hymn Rock of ages," and played Chopin's Funeral March as the coffin was borne out of the church. At the conclusion of the service at the graveside Sergt. Burgees, late of the Cheshire Regiment, sounded the "Last Post," and a most impressive ceremony was brought to a conclusion.

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NIGHT POACHING NEAR CHESTERI…

MENDELSSOHN'S HYMN OF PRAISE.…

POPULAR RAILWAY OFFICIAL.…

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- AN UNSUCCESSFUL ALIBI. 4D

WHY ENDURE SORE THROAT 1 «

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