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THE MfLWR DRAINAGE BILL. I

KEN SIT LEADERS FRANCE.

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LITERARY NOTICES.

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LITERARY NOTICES. THE FEBRUARY MAGAZINES. [FIRST NOTICE ] In the current number of "Blackwood" a remi- niscence of the historic fight on Dargai heights is given under the title of "Three Gambits" "Random Recollections of Old Galway Life" bristle with bright breezy stories characteristic of Irish wit and humour; "The Siege of Arrah" brings into strong relief an incident of the Indian Mutiny that, for our country's sake, ought never to be allowed to fade from memory; "Russia and Japan" is a pointed review of the naval situation of those antagonistic powers; "Foreign Trade Fal- lacies" is one more nail in the mouldering ooffin of Free Trade; and the writer of "Musings with- out method-' waxes delightfully sarcastic upon Mr. Stead's new journalism and the German Em- peror's maladroit speeches. "Scolopax" has muoh to say on sporting dogs and their treatment. Regarding the management of shooting dogs the writer observes: — It may be said that, however much attention you have been in the habit of bestowing upon your doggy friends after a day at grouse or part- ridges, about twice the amount of rubbing, fresh straw about twice as often, and even twice the amount of dinner, will be required to keep them in sound health and keenness. Snipe- ehooting is cold weary work, demanding more of a dog's vital energy than any ether sport with the gun. Except at the very beginning of a season, do not be afraid of over-foeding. A dog in hard condition cannot have too much nour- ishing food, though a daily mass ol pulpy bis- cuit will do more harm than good. Give them plenty of meat, boiled calf's head or bullock's liver is the best, with a. good-sized bone, too F large to be easily crushed, for them to amuse themselves upon and improve teeth and diges- tion when the meal is over. If a dog returns rery exhausted from shooting, it is as well not to give him his dinner at once, but immediate- ly after his rubbing to let him lap a basin of broken biscuit, soaked in warm milk, not put- ting his meat before him ulit-I an hour or so has elapsed, during which he may have rested and comforted himself on his dry straw. A dog thoroughly done up will either refuse his fcod a.together or bolt it so carelessly that it will be wasted or actually harmful, besides which the fever of mind and body caused by a long day's exciting toil must be allowed to subside before the animal will be in condition to benefit by his meal. See that all thorns and ticks (which sim- ply swarm upon dogs in the early part of a mild winter) are carefully removed before a dog is allowed to leave the hands cf his rubber. The later pests will be found clinging chiefly to a dog's fore parts, and especially behind the ears, no doubt being collected off as his chest and shoulders brush through the long grass, and if Buffered to remain will grow to an enormous size, causing no end of irritation and loss of much-needed rest. They may easily be felt by passing the fingers through the coat. In rub- bing down special attention should be paid to the spaces between the toes, a° the whole con- dition of the feet depends on these parts being kept thoroughly clean and dry. It will be noticed that a dog returning dirty and wet from shooting will always commence his toilet, if left to himself, by licking first his feet, then his legs, then his loin s and1 belly, indicating the order of things on which, to his own mind, his comfort depends. Prince Victor Duleep Singh has written an in- teresting account of "The Grange, Alresford," the seat, of Lord Ashburton for the "Famous Homes of Sport" gerie3 in the February issue of the "Badminton Magazine of Sports and Pastimes." The article is illustrated by a reproduction in colours of Mr. Archibald Stuart-Wortley's well- known picture "Partridge Driving," which was painted specially for Lord Ashburton, and' depicts a drive on the estate. "Jockeys and Jockeyship" by a jockey is the eleventh instalment of "The Racing World and its Inhabitants," a series of ar- ticles which has created so much interest in racing circles. Mr. Claude Johnson, late secretary of the Automobile Club, contributes "The Magnificent Mercedes: The Rich Man's Motor Car," which shews the other side of the subject so recently dealt with in this magazine by Major C. G. Mat- ron's series of articles on "The Modest Man s Motor." The Arbor Day Movement—the aims and ob- jects of which a.re dealt with very fully in a paper by Mr. E. D. Tili, in the February "Pel.son'.s" is deserving of all support. Its chief object is to clothe bare country with a luxuriant growth of trees. The movement was started in America, where they know the value of trees better, per- haps, than we do. But as long ago as 1897 it had its first beginning in this country, in the little vil- lage of Eynsford, in Kent, where the tree-planting festival of Arbor Day is now observed year by year. In the beginning, at Eynsford, the Arbor Day idea was not a little ridiculed. The same pre- judice prevailed that had been felt in Nebraska. It was lived down in ebraska-and so at Eyns- ford. Now Arbor Day is welcomed, and' efforts are being made in many quarters to spread the custom throughout the length and breadth of the country. So at least the beginning has been made toward's the establishment of an Arbor Day in Great Britain. More power to the ca.u?o! It is an idea, worthy of all support. And an Arbor Day is easily established in, any place. The practice of tree-planting incurs little ex- pense, a.nd the trees, once planted and1 properly tended, may be regarded in the light of invest- ing machines, which automatically accumulate compound interest, and repay their cost in after years a hundred and a thousand-fold. There is a movement on foot to clothe the Black Country of England with trees. Around Birmingham and other large towns in the Midlands there are thousands of acres which are little better than black, desolate wildernesses, which, if planted with suitable trees, might be converted again in- to charming green landscapes, in spite of iron and coal works. Princess Alice of Albany and Prince Alexander of Teck are very much in the public eye at present on account of their wedding this month. There is some very interesting, infdrmation given about them in the "Lady's Magazine." Princess Alice of Albany, who is the daughter of King Edward's youngest brother, the late Prince Leopold, is a special favourite of her illustrious uncle. She is dark-haired, pretty, and graceful, and dresses with taste and sim- plicity. Like most of the Royal iadies she is very musical and an excellent linguist, and like her cousin, the young Queen of Holland, is a first- rate horsewoman. She can handle the reins as skilfully as a man, and may often be seen driv- ing a diminutive Shetland pony in the neigh- bourhood of Claremont, for she is devoted to outdoor life, and loves the freedom and unre- straint of the country. Although very English in her tastes and' appearance, she has inherited much of her mother's German domesticity and simplicity of character. Prince Alexander ha.s always taken his profession very seriously. He holds the rank of captain in the Hussars, and Rerved with great distinction in the Matebele and Boer wars. After his return from South Africa, he was stationed at Hampton Court, and the story goes that when there was a shortage, of men to groom and feed the horses, he would quietly take off his coat every morning and, set to work in the stable with dandy brush and curry comb, like an ordinary trooper. He accom- panied the Prince and Princess of Wales in their tour round the world, and made friends every- where by his bonhomie and' kindness of heart. "Good Words" is an attractive number, among the most noteworthy features being "The Romance of Music" by J. F. Rowbotham; "The Marvellous Maguey of Mexico" by Arthur Inkersley; and "Reason and Rationalism from the Side of Religion" by Canon H. Hensley Hea- son. The chief items in the "Sunday Magazine" are "Man's Place in the Universe" by the Rev. John Urquhart; "The Influences of Modern Life" by the Rev. C. SIlvester Horne; "My Philosophy of Life" by Helen Kelle-r; and "The People of the Abyss" by Charles Ray; an article shewing what is being done municipally, philanthropi'calfy, and religiously to help the poorest classes in London, and to raise them from their dreadful life of die- gTadation. The "Captain" for February is replete with ar- ticles and stories of exceptional interest. An in- teresting history is given of "Blundell's School," Tiverton, where the author of "Lorna Doone" was educated. Mr. Archibald Williams continues his eminently practical article on making a model horizontal engine, illustrated with working dia- grams; Mr. Nankivell, the Philatelic Editor, con- 'ributes an article on "About the Quaint Stamps or Alsace and Lorraine," which were issued by the erman Army of Occupation during the Franco- inter11? }VarT and Mr. Step deals with matters of* p ,.to all students of natural history, while and in u"g ^it0T writes on "Ogling <1S a Sport." some of th "^itorial," the "Old Fag" quotes "Howler's''° replies received in a recent specimen t £ 2™Pptition, of which we append a wrote the En tYS was a general. He name was OP"It!c',to the Hebrews. His other a-tes I, "Sunday Strang.°l Church Attendance," in the chant pa-par Symposium, has drawn a tren- faraous author ^r- Frank T. Bullen, the capital article Y'-V1 Christ at Sea," and a Derby. The B;auCon J^uted by Canon Talbot of month is entitled ?'Pon's "Bible Talk" this Heaven," and is Welder Betwixt Earth and e oquence. UP to his own standard of 1604," which &moL a^pton Court Conference of the retranslation of o things determined upon ally produced that u ,CriPtures which oVentu- Aufchorised Version English undefiled," the ing paper, and is ""Portant and interest- Ang-us'n story "A l.l^^y illustrated. Ormc traied by Tom Browne"1 r ? Teaeiip," is ilhis- Wue> R I-. and ia excellent reading. The same may be said of the other com- plete stories, "A Ringmell Day," by C. Ed- wardos; "Miss Delmore's Diamonds," a story of the temptations of Bridge, by Grace Pettman; "Such Stuff as Dreams are Made of" by May Ellis Nioolls. In "An Abode of Darkness," tie Charity Commissioner of the "Sunday Strand" gives some graphic word-pictures of the conditions of the people who live in the south-east of Lon- don, and Maud Ballington Booth concludes her article on "Work Among Convicts" as eloquently and pathetically as she commenced it in January. The "Cornhiil Magazine" for February opens with the second instalment of Mr. E. W. Mason's story "The Truants." In "Seme Empty Chairs," Mr. Henry W. Lucy gives reminiscences of several colleagues or friends who have recently passed away: Sir John Robinson, Mr. Seale Hayne, Mr. John Penn, Sir Blundell Maple, and' Lord Row- er ton. Chief among the other features is an article on "Macedonia—and after." In a word, the Ottoman Empire in Asia, which a few years ago was little better than, a geopraphical expression, is being welded into a sol d political whole, which, when the stress comes, will add a weight still unknown to the Ottoman influence in the world's affairs. Nor, as Indian officials have had reason to know, is the improvement of the Sultan's position in Asia confined to his own territories. His pan Islamic propaganda has established itself much farther afield, and has probably not yet reached the term of its expansion. Surely, when one sees with what iron consistency, behind all com- promises and throughout all diplomacy, this strong and reasoned policy of pan Islamism has been pursued in the face of such foes within and without, as no other empire '.n the world has h d to take into account, it is impossible any longer to use that hackneyed phrase of Czar Nicholas—the "Sick Man." There is abundant vitality in the Ottoman system yet, as there is in more than one great race t-hst is, and will long remain, faithful to Osmanli rule. "The World's Work" for February contains a full-page portrait of the Duke of Devonshire, K.G., admirably produced, and many able ar- ticles that should attract the attention of serious thinkers. "A Revolution in Milk Supply" by C. W. Saleeby, M.B., Ch.B., is especially noticeable. A remarkable new discovery promises to re- vo.uticnise the whole method of milk-supply in all civilised countries, and therein most marked- ly to lower the death-rate and the pre-sent dis- graceful waste of infant life. By this new dis- covery—known as tIe Just-Hatmaker process— there is produced a light, yellow.sh, flaky powder, which, when water is added to it. is reconverted into milk, indistinguishable by the senses of sight, taste, and smell, or by chemical and phy- siological examination, from fresh milk. It is, indeed, distinguishable by bacteriological exami- nation, for whereas even fresh milk contains millions of bacteria, descended in a few hours from the few thousands derived from the lacteal passages of the cow, the milk thus prepared is absolutely sterile--oontains, that is to say, no microbes whatever. The powder can be sent by post in boxes so constructed as to permit no serial bacteria to enter, and opecmenswhich have been sent round the world, remaining three weeks at Shangai en route, have been found to be- absolutely germ-free and in perfect condition. Careful ohemical examination has been unable to detect any difference in chemical composi- tion between ordinary milk and the milk pro- duced by adding water to this powder. More than four hundred bacteriological examinations have shewn that the powder is absolutely sterile when it comes from the drying machine. It has further been shewn—and this is of the ut- me-t importance—that when living and viru- 'J.L.1- 1- 1 .1l 1 lent luuercie Dacnii, or otners. suc-n as tne bacillus of anthrax, are introduced into the milk before the drying process, they are killed. Consider what it will mean when you can order by parcels post a year's supply of milk at a time! "The Forbidden City of Lhassa," by M. Tys- bikov, is an article of exceptional interest in this month's "Strand Magazine." This is the first account of the city written by a visitor since the French missionary Abbe Hue spent a few months there in 1845. A number of illustrations from, photos add to the interest of an adventurous jour- ney in a mysterious land. The "Story of Brad- shaw," by Newton Deane, will appeal to every- one interested in our railways, and illustrates in a popular manner the marvellous developments since the first number of the famous railway guide was published in October, 1839. For the purpose of writing "Voices in Parliament." over 200 different speeches were sampled, and while the article is, of course, in no sense political, it will interest the thousands of political voters of this country. "Golden Bars" is a story of African treasure by Max Pemberton. "Oiir Grand- mothers' Fashion Plates," which illustrate from old prints and sketches the fashions of our ances- tors, will interest the ladies perhaps little less Jhap the continuation of Mr. Jac-obs's story, "Dialstone Lane," another instalment of which is certainly the most laughter-producing section of the February number. Conam Doyle contri- butes the fifth story of the new adventures cf Sherlock Holmes, entitled "The Adventure of the Pnory School." NEW BOOKS. W, £ E ?^EPrEJP ?00K-" by A. Stodart J\aJker and P. Jeffrey Mackie (Geo. A. Morton, Edinburgh. 3s. 6d. nett.)—This is a useful guide to the duties of a gamekeeper, and, although in- tended primarily for keepers, it will be found of service to sportsmen generally. There are special chapters by surh well-known writers on sport as Lord Douglas Graham, Capt. H. Shaw Kennedy, Dr. Chas. Reid, John Lamb, P. D. Mallock, Tom Speedy, and others. A handy index deserves men- tion. NEW PUBLICATIONS. The "Century Book of Gardening," Parts 21 and 22, are essentially popular numbers. Con- tinuing the article on "Kitchen Gardening," we have such staple articles of diet treated as horse- radish, leeks, lettuces, mushrooms, mustard and cress, onions, parsnips, peas, potatoes, etc., with a useful time-table for amateur gardeners shew- ing when to sow, varieties, and their season. An interesting and useful contribution deals with "Insect Enemies and Friends in the Flower Gar- den, the Kitchen Garden, and the Orchard," and is fully illustrated, so that there should be no trouble in identifying- them. I

NATIONAL PROVINCIAL BANK .

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IWIRRAL GUARDIANS.

THE FISCAL PROBLEM,

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ILIBERALISM I. FLINTSHIRE…

MR. LEVER AND WIRRAL.

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MR. STANLEY AT FRODSHAM.

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