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jAGR 1C U LTURE.

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AGR 1C U LTURE. RETURN OF THE WET WEATHER. Notwithstanding the return of wet weather, considerable progress has been made with plough- ing during the last week or two, and it is rather cheering in journeying into different parts of the county to notice considerable breadths of well- turned soil awaiting the diills and harrows. This is only on the lighter lands as much of the low- lying is excessively wet and unfit for tillage pur- I poses; the atmosphere, evz:n when no rain has fallen, not being suffiientiy diying to affect the surface to any appreciable extent. But a good month still intervenes before March, which is considered early enviugh to begin sowing. The winter-sown wheat, what there is of it, looks well where it had the good foitune to be drilled in properly. But much cannot be said in favour of the chance work of broadcasting and scuffling, 88 adopted in some instances, where farmers made desperate efforts in November to be abreast of the work. It is at best but a slovenly and unsatis- factory process, and those witO have adopted it, it may be readily conceived, have no reason to be proud of the job We have h"d a few gleams of sunshine and promises of blighter days, but un- fortunately heavy showers have succeeded to mar the situation. The Prospect of the lengthening daylight, however, is a hopeful feature; and though it is said "as the daj lengthens the cold strengthens," it may be taken that almost any change from the monotonous rain will be accept- able. Sheep still manage to find a living on the fast-failing pastures aided by a few roots and hay, but cattle and dairy cows have had for some time to be specially cared for. The touches of frost at intervals have had the wholesome effect of keep- ing in check vegetation which has shewn itself too forward, and it is to be hoped that what of winter yet remains will come in proper order, so that tiis disastrous faiiuie of fruit and other crops last year may not be repeated. The latest reports from the early lambing districts are still very unpromising, both in regard to numbers and mortality. Fresh competition is threatening the British fruit-grower in regard to the importation of a new variety of summer apple. Of course the stranger hails from America. It is named the Randolph, is said to have been tested and found suitable for shipment It has an acidulated but pleasant flavour, and, having a vivid scarlet colour, is very attractive. A report comes from Winterton that two men saw a cuckoo there last week. They at first thought it to be a species of sparrow-hawk. But all doubt was set at rest when the bird uttered its well-known note From the report of estimates issued by the Irish Department of Agriculture it appears that all the crops come out smaller for 1903, compared with those of the previous year; and wheat, barley, oats, potatoes, turnips and mangolds, are below the ten years' averages. According to the same authority, all crops in the United Kingdom were lower for 1903 than for 1902, oats, beans, peas and hay alone working out above the ten years' averages. A Reuter's telegram from Capetown on Wed- nesday stated that a ten ific rainstorm occurred on the previous day, sweep ng away a railway bridge. Two gi:ders weighing sixty-two tons each were carried 300 yards down the Lesseyton River, which rose 30ft in forty minutes. Much damage was done to property but luckily no casualties to human life are reported. As evidence of the severity of the weather re- cently, it may be mentioned that the lifeless body of a farmer named Brooks w • s found in a wood at Sedgley. Stanordslrre. He left his club shortly before eleven o'clock on the preus night to return home. The night was intensely cold, and it is supposed that when parsing through the wood he kumblrd and fell, and being unable to raise himself he died from exposure, being in fact frozen to death. Canada has been experiencing the most pro- tracted spell of extremely coid weather known there for thirty years. The cold is accompanied by heavy snowfalls. Dr. Derham. presiding at the annual dinner of the Walkden Tenant Farmers' Association, re- ferring to th? subject of co-operation, said ex- cessive competition multiplied expenses, reduced prices, lowered quality, and wasted time; while co-operation reduced expenditure, increased prices to a normal figure, ;mproved quality, and saved time. The Gloucestershire Chamber of Agriculture have passed a resolution affirming that a larger proportion than has hit he-to benn the case of the County Council funds applicable to technical education should be devoted to theoretical and practical agricultural teaching. Mr. A. D. Hall of Rothamsted, says the only hope for the British wheat-grower to combat with his foreign and colonial rivals lies in the success of our enterprisincr seedsmen in evolving new and improved varieties of corn He cannot ex- pect to hold his own with the existing sorts, none of which possess th- swelling capabilities of the best wheats from the North-West, of America, while the adoption of the American varieties even would not materially imnrovo his nosition since the foreign wheats of srreat strength are all "hnd oroppers." v p-o-n A WORD IN SEASON. "Land and Water Illustrated" say, "A word of warning is not out of place to all those who contemplate purchasing seed corn and dover seeds, not forgetting that, valuable plant sainfoin. There is no doubt seed will be scarce and dear to buv. but the most important. and difficult matter will be to procure genuine stuff. There is a lot of over-heated corn in the country, and all intended for seed ought to be tested before purchasing, or a warranty as to its germinating powers ob- tained from the vendor. The former method is advisable, and will save trouble afterwards My advice respecting broad clover and sainfoin is to let it alone for this year as there was so little seed secured in this country worth sowing. There will no doubt be plenty of foreitm seed to be ob- tained, especially of sainfoin, and after the results I have seen I stroncrlv adviso. postponing the seed- in? of sainfoin and broad clover for a year." LINCOLNSHIRE FARMERS AND THE TARIFF. At the annual meeting of the Lincolnshire Chamber of Agriculture, at Grimsby, resolutions were passed supporting the propositions of Mr. Chamberlain in their entirety, advocating the ad- mission of all Colonial produce, the revision of local taxation, the admission free of duty of tea, coffee, drugs, etc., and an allowance of 5s. per quarter to farmers holding their wheat in stock and threshmg it out between April 30 and Sep- tember 1 every year. La-d Heneage. in advo- cating the last-named proposition, said he did so on the ground of national policy, and not as a sop to the farmers of this country. The formation of Mr. Chamberlain's Commission was justified in every way. He regretted there was not a man on the Commission itself to directly represent the agricultural interest. Lord Yarmouth, who en- dorsed the views of Lord Heneage, said it did not appear that the representation, as at present pro- posed, was at all adequate for the importance of agriculture, which had the first claim for assist- ance in any Tariff reform SHROPSHIRES AT CHICAGO With regard to the fat stock show at Chicago, the "Breeders' Gazette" says:—The Shropshires again maintained their superiority in numbers and popularity. It was undoubtedly one of the best shows of the breed ever made in this coun- try. The winners included Dr. Davison, Geo. Allen, Richard Gibson, John Campbell, J. G. Hanmer, Lloyd Jones Bros., and others, and in the fat sheep section the grand ohampionship for all breeds, grades, and crosses was won by the Wisconsin Experimental Station Farm with a Shropshire grade, and the championship for the best wether lamb was secured by Richard Gibson with a Shropshire lamb. The value of the pure- bred Shropshire ram on the grade ewe was clearly proved by the fact that this cross secured the grand-championship of the show. u n-n. CANADIAN AND AivlKKIUAIN YY iliiAX CROPS. The final estimate of the wheat crop of Ontario in 1903 is 21,893,470 bushels, against 26,281,700 for 1902. The corresponding figures for Manitoba are 40,000,000 bushels, as compared with 53.000,000; and for the North-West Territories they are 16,735,000 bushels, against 13,956,850. Apart from the small quantities grown in Quebec and the Maritime Provinces (usually set at about 2,000,000 bushels), for which there is no official return, the total for 1903 is 78,628,470 bushels, as compared with 93,238,550 for 1902. The official estimate of the wheat crop of the United States in 1903 is 637,822,000 bushels, as compared with 670,063,000 for 1902. For maize the estimate is 2,244 177,000 bushels, or 279,471,000 less than the good crop of 1902. Oats also have turned out less productive than in 1902. the reckoning being 784 094,000 bushels, against 987.843,000. Barley is grown on only a compara- tively small scale, the total being 131,861,000 bushels, or 3,093,000 loss than in the preceding year. It is curious to notice that only about the same quantity of potatoes as is produced in the United Kingdom in an average of years is grown in the United States for double our population. The estimate for 1903 is 247,128,000 bushels, or a little over 6,000,000 tons. FUTURE OF MANITOBA. The Hon. G. E. Drummond. president of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, speaking at a banquet given by that association, referred to th great future in store for the province of Manitoba, and stated that: "Competent autho- rities assume that within the next ten years Manitoba will have ten millions of acres of land under cultivation. Computing the increased acreage in ten years by last year's acreage in crop, Manitoba will then be producing in one year over 168.340 280 bushels of wheat, 92,655,290 bushels of oats, 21,787,160 bushels of barley, and in all grains 283,933,860 bushels. Assuming a similar increase in acreage in the territories, and making allowance for varying local conditions, it is computed that the production in Manitoba and the territories ten years from now will be 350,000,000 bushels of wheat, 200000,000 bushels of oats. and 50.000.000 bushels of barley. This is given on the authority of the Deputy Minister of Agriculture of Manitoba. The average require- ments of Great Britain yearly are, say, in the vicinity of 175,000,000 to 200,000,000 bushels. The question that will, therefore, in due time confront agriculturists of the west, and indeed the faimers of all Canada, is where shall we find a market for, say, our wheat in ten years from now? The answer to that question is or rather should be, 'Right here in the home maikel.; for, say, our wheat in ten years from now? The answer to that question is or rather should be, 'Right here in the home maikel.;

--_-----! ANTHKAX IN CHESHIRE.I

ACTON PLOUGHING MATCH.

OUR FOOD SUPPLY.

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