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LITERARY NOTICES. + NEW BOOKS. "FLORA AND SYLVA," VOL. 1.* The first annual volume of this valuable monthly review of horticulture and arboriculture is a remarkable testimony to the publisher's pluck and enterprise. The twelve monthly parts are printed on surprisingly substantial, not to eay artistic, old-fashioned paper, in fine bold type, and bound in a sumptuous style that makes it an orna- ment to any library. The editor, Mr. W. Robin- son, already well known as the author of "The English Flower Garden. "Alpine Flowers for Gardens" and "The Wild Garden," explains in the preface that the hot chase after process illustra- tions, small type, tin-shine paper, smudge- lithographs, tomb-stone weights and the less de- lightful features of modern books awakened within him the spirit cf old things and impelled him to his printer. The latter could not at first comprehend the meaning of the editor, who says: "I went home for Baskerville's Virgil, and asked him to get as near to it as he could in type, went with flower drawings to the best colour-printer in Europe; to the paper mills that still make real paper, and found surviving a wood-engraver who understood my good artist's drawings, and so began." The success that has attended this ex- poriment and effort is abundantly demonstrated in the handsome volume comprising the first year's issue of "Flora and' Sylva." We took the oppor- tunity of reviewing the initial monthly number of the work nearly a year ago, and it now only remains to be said that throughout the twelve months the review has maintained its high repu- tation as an authority for lovers of garden, wood- land, tree or flower. The object of the magazine ia the illustration in life-size and the best way artistically of new trees, shrubs and flowers in- troduced from other countries in our own time, tnd the revision from the planter's point of view of all the great families hardy in our islands. One idea that has dominated the general scheme of the work is that periodicals of the same kind have always been over-much devoted to flowers and plants as distinct from trees and shrubs. "Every day of my life," says the editor. "I see more and more the beauty and value of the tree. So I married Flora to Sylva-a pair not far apart in Nature, only in books." We heartily concur in the editor's estimate of the beauty, use and im- portance of trees in the national economy, and trust that. one result of his labours will be a re- awakening in this country at least in the matter of reafforestation. Our columns have recently borne witness to the importance of this subject, and we are glad to see (p. 36 et seq.) that a writer on "Home Woods" takes up the question in earnest. The wood', says the article, is a mighty worker for man. a precious gift of beauty as well as profit. "For the wood, unlike the farm, wants few costly labourers, no weeding or ploughing, finds its own manure, does its own watering, finds its own shade and shelter, and does all this and much more work. and without the aid of the col- leges now thought necessary to make the good gardener or farmer. Moreover, if all the wit of man, backed by all the learning of the colleges, were on one side, and a wood of our best native trees on the other, the wood would certainly give a better return than (ould be got from any labour or capital applied to the same class of land in other ways." The writer proceeds to point out that nowhere is the shelter of belts of evergreen trees more required than on our wind-shorn coast- land. "If we neglect, owing to the length of ex- posed coast, to give shelter, the trees and shrubs are cut off, as by giant shears, above the walls. But where we have the ever-green wood (begin- ning with wind-resisting shrubs working up to the higher trees) we have perfect shelter, as at Bodor- gan in Anglesey, on one of the most wind-shorn coasts." The, writer further lays stress upon the utility of tree-planting upon poor land, the quick- ness of the growth of certain types of timber, and the value of trees for fuel in England. Our neigh- bour, the Rev. C. Wolley-Dod, of Malpas, con- tributes an interesting article on "The Geranium." Hints on the culture of various shrubs, on "Live Fencing for Woodland," on "Mast or Brushwood," on "Pear Orchards for Beauty" are but a few specimens of the interest- ing and instructive contents of the work. Nor is the floral side of the, theme neglected, the illus- trations, coloured plates and wood-engravings being on a lavish scale and of exceptionaJ artistic merit, while the value of the volume is enhanced by a good index. "PEARSONS HOME MANAGEMENT. Messrs. C. Arthur Pearson, Ltd., have just issued the first of a dozen numbers of "Home Manage- ment" at 7d. each, edited by Isobel, of "Home Notes" fame. The work is one that will appeal successfully to the matron, whether her establish- ment be a small flat, a semi-detached villa or a mansion. The subjects treated of cover the whole range of domesticity, from the management of the family to the management of servants and the conduct of entertainments and preparations for guests. The practical utility of the completed work will be more than ephemeral, and well worthy of binding for subsequent consultation. NEW MUSIC. Some attractive new music, vocal and instru- mental, has just been published by Messrs. For- syth Brothers, Ltd music publishers. 267, Regent- street, London, W. Lohr's School Songs (music by L. Robinson, 4d. each). This delightful series of school songs deserves particular praise, so suit- able are they, both in words and music, for what they are intended. Special mention should be made of "Roundelay" and "Birdie" (the words of the latter by Tennyson), and "Flower Fairies," also a very nice setting of "Up the Airy Moun- tain, Down the Rushing Glen." In each of them the melodies are simple and cheerful, the very best recommendation for a school song. "Merry Lavs," a pianoforte solo by Valentine Hemery (3s.), is an easy recreation piece after the same pattern as the ever-juvenile "Elves Caprice" by the same composer. It is the sort, of piece dear to every child's heart, and will brighten up the dull landscape of hard work. "Morning Song." pianoforte solo by Valentine Hemery (4s.) is more elaborate than the foregoing, and although not so attractive, is very melodious. It is a "song without words," with a good chord accompaniment. "II Ledesco," pianoforte solo by Arthur Giulians (3s.). This composition is very much of the nature of a study, with fine octave practice for the right hand and arpeggio chords for the left. "John Bull and Sons," pianoforte solo by A. M. Richmond (2s. nett)-a, stirring English march, good throughout, although the principal theme is decidedly the best. "Nick-Nacks," for piano- forte. by A. Glentvale (Is. nett)—a small book of five little pieces for young performers, the best among them being "A Sunny Morning" (valse) and "A Merry Dance" (polka). "Jolly Tar" and "Dreamland" (2s. each), Nos. 4 and 6 of musical miniatures by B. Mansell Ramsey, arranged as pianoforte duets. Both are extremely simple and tuneful pieces. "A Souvenir of Corelli and Tar- tini" (by E. Haddock) is a. pretty theme for the violin treated in eight variations. The move- ments are excellent as exercises in bowing.

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