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SEEIOTJS CHARGES AGAINST A…

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COUNTY POLICE COURT. »-

CITY POLICE COURT. 4

NESTON PETTY SESSIONS. ♦

CAERGWRLE PETTY SESSIONS.…

CHILDREN AS BEER MESSENGERS.

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CHESHIRE LADY'S SAD END. ♦

MR. G. WYNDHAM ON SOUTH AFRICA.…

|FAILURE OF A CHESTER BUTCHER.…

THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO A TRANMERE…

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THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO A TRANMERE GENTLEMAN. —♦ SCBNE AT THE INQUEST. Before Mr. H. Churton, coroner of Birken- head, an inquest was held on Tuesday, touching the death of William E. Carnon, 50 years old, who lived at 55, Willowbank-road, Devonshire Park, Tranmere, who died on Sunday from the result of a street accident on the 1st inst. Mr. F. S. Moore appeared for the relatives of deceased, and Mr. P. Hughes (Messrs. Thomp- son, Hughes, and Mathieson) represented Messrs. Davies and Son, car proprietors.—Dr. Pearson, senior house surgeon at the Borough Hospital, stated that deceased was admitted te the institution on the 1st inst. He was suffer- ing from a compound fracture of the left leg, the bone being very badly smashed. Dirt had also got into the wound, and this set up suppuration. On the 15th inst. it was found necessary to amputate the limb, and death ensued on Sunday at the hospital. William Henry Ameer, cab proprietor. Higher Tranmere, stated that on the evening of the 1st instant he was near Woodside Ferry, and saw the deceased crossing from the direction of the Woodside Station to Hamilton-street. It was raining very badly at the time, and deceased bad his umbrella up in front of him. When near the Railway Receiving Office he was knocked down by a waggonette drawn by three horses coming with passengers from the agricultural showyard. He appeared to walk right into the conveyance. The wheels passed over his legs, and witness and others carried him to the parcel office, where he stated several timeli that it was a pure accident. He was removed in an ambulance to the Borough Hospital, and requested witness to telephone to a constable at Tranmere to break the news to Mrs. Carnon as quietly as possible. Mr. F. S. Moore at this point asked the coroner's permission- to call deceased's son, to whom he had made a statement as to the accident.—The Coroner: Who are you ? I don't know you.—Mr. Moore: I am a solicitor. I have appeared before you on previous occasions. The Coroner I think it is a great impertinence for a young man like you to come forward at this moment.—Mr. Moore: I was only asking your permis- sion to call deceased's son, and I think I did it politely.—The Coroner I think it very im- pertinent for any young man to come here and try to upset the jury's mind by some hearsay statement he has no right to make.—Mr. Moore I don't think you heard me, sir. I was only asking you to hear the son of the deceased.— The Coroner I have heard enough, and I don't want to hear you again; and if you interfere with me much longer I shall shew you which door to go through.—Mr. Moore: Oh, I am going now, sir.—The Coroner: Very well; I will not have my business interfered with. We cannot get beyond the fact that it was an accident.—Several of the jury intimated that they would like to hear the evidence of the deceased's son, but the Coroner thought it was not necessary to call him, and ultimately a verdict of Accidental death' was returned.

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HARVEST FESTIVALS.

THE DEE MUSSEL FISHERY. 0

A BROTHER AND HIS WRONGED…

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