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CHESTER UNION CONTRACT DAY.…

HAWARDEN PETTY SESSIONS. 4

SAVAGE ASSAULT AT TATTENHALL.…

CHESTER ROYALTY THEATRE. .

THE CUT BUDGET. ■,

WILL IOF A CHESHIRE MAGISTRATE.…

THE FATALITY AT A CHESHIRE…

DISTRICT AND PARISH COUNCIL.…

THE BROWN COW, WAVERTON. +

ISLE OF MAN MINING COMPANY.…

MR. GLADSTONE AND EASTERN…

THE CHESHIRE FEDERATION OF…

NANTWICH MAGISTRATES' & TENANTS'…

PROPOSED INFECTIOUS HOSPITALS…

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MOLD ADJOURNED LICENSING SESSIONS.…

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EDDISBURY PETTY SESSIONS.…

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EDDISBURY PETTY SESSIONS. 0 MONDAY.—Before Messrs. James Tomkinson Hugh Lyle Smyth, C. Threlfall, S. H. Wood- house, and J. W. Smith. DISEASED MEAT PROSECUTION. WELL-KNOWN FARMER FINED. Cyrus D. Slater, farmer, Woodford Hall, Over, was summoned for being the owner of an out- house in which was deposited, for the purpose of preparation for sale, the carcase of a cow unfit for food. Thomas Blackburne, butcher, Over, was summoned for being the owner of the meat, and John Johnson, butcher, Over, was summoned for aiding and abetting. Mr. Parkinson, Winsford, prosecuted on behalf of the Winsford Urban District Council. Mr. J. J. Dixon, Northwich, defended Slater, and Mr. Chesters, Crewe, defended Blackburne and Johnson. Mr. Parkinson stated that on Tues- day, September 7th, Mr. Ralph Oakes, inspector of nuisances to the Winsford Urban District Council, attended Mr. Slater's farm, and asked him if he had a cow which bad been slaughtered there. Slater said he had, and Oakes, on making the request, was told he might see it. Slater volunteered the information that the cow had suffered from milk fever, and was slaughtered after the disease was discovered. Oakes saw the carcase, which was dressed in the usual way, and together with Mr. Harper, veterinary surgeon, he examined it. In the word of the inspector, the carcase was very I swabby to feel, and Mr. Slater said the fact that the animal had suffered from milk fever might account for that. Mr. Slater said the cow calved on the previous Saturday, she was taken ill on Sunday he gave her a bottle of linseed oil, and on the Monday he had her slaughtered. The lungs of the cow were buried, but Mr. Oakes had them disinterred. Mr. Oakes and Mr. Harper ex- amined the internal organs of the cow, and the result they came to was that the cow had suffered from a species of blood poisoning or inflammation. Mr. Slater said he had had the cow slaughtered himself, and had sold it to Blackburne. He added that the cow in its proper health was worth 13 or 14 -guineas, and that he had sold it for five guineas. When Blackburne came upon the scene he said he had slaughtered the beast for Mr. Slater. Black- burne contended that the cow was right enough and fit for food, and he volunteered the state- ment, 'It would have passed the inspector at Manchester if it had got through at Winsford.' Johnson afterwards said that his money had paid for the cow. The following day Mr. Oakes and Mr. Harper went to Mr. Slater's, accom- panied by Dr. Garstang, medical officer of health for the district, and Dr. Armitage, assistant to Dr. Okell. The two doctors examined the carcase, and their opinion was that it was diseased and totally unfit for food, the animal having evidently suffered very severely from inflammation of some kind. The outside of the carcase on the right shoulder, extending down to the ribs, was very much bruised, this symptom betraying that the animal must .have suffered great pain before being slaughtered, and had punished itself in the shippon while suffering pain. This sort of thing had been very much on the increase in the district for some time. The inspector bad had two suspicious cases against Johnson before, and had had to warn him. The Bench heard a similar case last December, and they fined a man X20. A month or six weeks ago a similar case was heard at Wharton, and the defendant in that case was fined X20 and costs.—Ralph Oakes, nuisance inspector, in bearing this statement out, said the carcase was totally unfit for human food. Apart from the condition of the internal organs, he should have thought from the colour of part of the outside of the cow that it was diseased. Witness admitted that the defendants had behaved perfectly openly throughout.—By the Chairman: It was not customary to bury the lungs of cows in these cases unless they were diseased.—J. Harper, veterinary surgeon, Over, said he came to the conclusion, from the ruddy colour of the m outside of the carcase, that the cow had had some inflammation. On examining the internal organs he found that the animal had suffered from blood poisoning and inflammation.-Cross- examined by Mr. Dixon Witness was of opinion that Mr. Slater thought he had a perfect right to slaughter the beast. If witness had not been able to see the lungs he might have hesitated about condemning the cow. Dr. Garstang deposed to coming to the conclusion, after examining the carcase, that it was not fit for human food. Cross-examined, witness con- sidered it possible if the carcase had been fully dressed and delivered at a central market that it might have passed an inspector who knew nothing of the previous circum- stances. By the Chairman He formed his opinion from the appearance of the lungs and spleen.—Dr. Armitage corroborated.—Mr. Dixon, on behalf of the defendant Slater, contended that his client had not done any- thing with a wicked and criminal intent, having simply made an error of judgment. Mr. Slater came from a long line of farmers, and he was the tenant of a large farm, and it was not likely that he would be so foolish as to besmirch the family name for the sake of a trumpery advantage.—Mr. Chesters said Blackburne was sent for by Mr. Slater to kill the cow, but Johnson had nothing to do with the case.—After the magistrates had deliberated together in private, the Chairman said the case had been extremely well conducted on both sides, and they had given it their most earnest consideration. They desired to impute the best motives to the defendants, but could not but be of opinion that a distinct breach of the law had been committed. While desiring to absolve the defendants from culpable intent, they felt an act of grave carelessness had been committed. They did not consider there was any case against Johnson, but they fined Slater X5 and costs, and Blaokburne 92 and costs. THE RISING SUN, TARPORLBY.—The licence of the Rising Sun, Tarporley, was transferred to Martha Woodward, widow of the late licensee. DUDDON ASSISTANT OVERSEER IN TROUBLE.— Richard Woodward, Duddon, was summoned that he being the assistant overseer of the township of Duddon did not pay over to Mr. J. H. A. Hall, treasurer of the Tarvin Union, E10 4s. lid., being a surcharge made upon him by Mr. F. O. Hartley, assistant district auditor. —Mr. W. H. Churton, who prosecuted on behalf of the public auditor, John Frederick Adams, who, he said, had taken out a summons against defendant to recover the amount. Henry Grant Bailey, deputy clerk to the Tarvin Union, said the audit was held in February, and he produced a book shewing the surcharge.- Defendant said he had not collected the money, and he could not pay it before he collected it.— Mr. Churton said it had nothing to do with it whether he collected the money or not. The surcharge was final. Moreover, defendant had had plenty of time to collect the money since March.—The Bench issued a distress warrant.

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CHESTER ART*LLERYME^N AT^EliAND"

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A YOUNG HEIR'S INSTABILITY.…

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