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! CHESTER OLD KING SCHOLARS.

DISTRICT AND PARISH COUNCILS.

DOMESTIC INFELICITY AT RHYL.

INTERMEDIATE EDUCATION IN…

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MOLD SCHOOL BOARD.

THE SALT SUBSIDENCES IN THE…

A CLERGYMAN ASSAULTED IN THE…

» REVISION COURTS.I

ODDFELLOWS AND THE ' WET-RENT'…

THE CURRICULUM OF VOLUNTARY…

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THE CURRICULUM OF VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS. ♦ CHESHIRE TEACHERS IN CONFERENCE. The members of the Chester, Northwich, and Knutford Teachers' Associations on Saturday held a conference in the National Schools, Northwich. In addition to the members from the towns named, there were representatives from Macclesfield, Altincham, Moulton, Barn ton, Little Leigh, Mold, and Christleton. Prior to < the business proceedings a visit was paid to the Baron's Quay rock salt mine, where Mr. T. Ward gave a description of the formation of rock salt, and the industry of salt making. The conference was presided over by Mr. R. I Lloyd (president of the Chester Association), who was supported by Dr. Beech, of Maccles- field (a member of the Executive of the N.U.T.), and Mr. Thomas Ward.—The Chair- man read a paper on the Birmingham Conference, and said that the results of that meeting could not fail to be beneficial to the Union of Teachers. It shewed that the Voluntary teachers were loyal unionists, and that they were not separated by narrow creed antipathies.—Mr. Thomas Ward gave an address on The evolu- tion of voluntary schools.' He said they were in the thick of the fiercest battle that bad been fought for many generations on the question of education. The characteristic of the past had been a strong individualism. There was a time when the Government took no part in dealing with the education of the masses. Later there was an attempt on the part of societies to grapple with the question, and these societies were almost all connected with religious denominations. Then the board schools were founded, not in place of, but as supplementary to the voluntary schools. If those who had done the work in the past were prepared to give the same results as other schools, they were entitled to the same payment, and although the tendency undoubtedly was for the growth of the board school, it would be impossible to crush out the voluntary schools by mere Act of Parliament. The great religious question, as it was called, was a very big one outside the school walls, but a very small one inside. The secondary schools of the future would be technical schools, and he thought the Govern- ment would be perfectly justified in dealing with the endowments devoted to the old grammar and other schools in such a way that they would be applied to the absolutely secondary education of the present day, and not confined to the education of three or four centuries ago. (Applause.) At present too many subjects were taught, and technical schools were not a success for that reason. He thought that in future the teachers of elemen- tary schools would have to look forward to the dropping out of old subjects and the intro- duction of new ones, and above all they would have to fit themselves to give an applied education. (Applause.)—Dr. Beech was the next speaker. He considered that there was no necessity to curtail the curri- culum, and that additional subjects might be taken with advantage if the school age was raised to fourteen. The increase in knowledge and mental discipline which would take place in the extra two years could scarcely be conceived. Regarding the voluntary schools' question he thought that the system would be extended in the future. Even the pitiable dole of 5s. would have the effect of arresting the I handing over of voluntary schools, and would actually tend to augment their number. He thought that the whole cost of secular instruc- I tion in voluntary schools would in the days to come be borne by the Government. With regard to technical education he agreed with Sir John Gorst that it was very doubtful indeed whether, during the course of its existence, the Science and Art Department had not done as much harm as good. On the other band, he thought that the work done by the Education Department was excellent.—A discussion took place, and afterwards the meeting closed with the customary votes of thanks.

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CITY POLICE COURT.

. MOLD PETTY SESSIONS. 0

LANCASHIRE AND THE DEE. 0

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!EAST DENBIGHSHIRE ELECTION.

Etterarg Notices. ----------------""_''''-'"""r,/''''r--/"..../...'-''-'''''''''''''''-----

WEEKLY STATE OF THE CHESTER…

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Family Notices

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