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THE MAYOR'S JUBILEE MEDAL.…

CITY POLICE COURT. —i

CHESTER BOARD OF GUARDIANS.…

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CHESTER LANTERN CYCLE PARADE.…

ALLEGED ATTEMPTED MURDER NEAR…

NORTH WALES POOR LAW CONFERENCE…

SMASH IN NORTHGATE STREET.…

SUICIDE OF A CHESTER WOMAN.…

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SUICIDE OF A CHESTER WOMAN. 4~ — CARBOLIC ACID AGAIN. INQUEST AND VERDICT. The Cheshire police on Monday morning received information at the headquarters at Chester to the effect that the body of a lady of about thirty-five years of age bad been discovered lying on the roadside near Capen- hurst railway station on Sunday night about ten o'clock. Near the body was a bottle which had contained carbolic acid, and it would appear that deceased had consumed a portion of the acid. In one of her dress pockets was found an account headed 'Mrs. Billington, St. Martin's, Chester,' and Detective-Inspector Pearson, instituting inquiries, ascertained that the deceased was a young married woman, Emily Billington, wife of William Arrowsmith Billington, retired publican, residing at St. Martin's Fields, Chester. At the Red Lion Inn, Little Sutton, on Monday evening, Mr. J. C. Bate, County Coroner, held an inquest on the body of the deceased. The husband, who was called, gave evidence as to identification, and said that he last saw his wife alive at half-past seven o'clock, at the Grosvenor Park Hotel, Chester, on Saturday evening. He was not aware that she had any carbolic acid in her possession. He had since seen the chemist from whom she had purchased a bottle, and the latter told him that he had cautioned her, telling her that it was a deadly poison, and asking her what she wanted it for. The deceased said it was for disinfecting purposes. The deceased did not seem at all excited, but was in her ordinary state of mind when she got it. He (witness) had no idea of what prompted his wife to commit the rash act. He never had any suspicion that she would do such a thing. On Sunday he received a letter, the address of which was written by his wife. It was a solicitor's application for a debt. On the back of the letter was written the following words in his wife's hand- writing Before you receive this I shall be beyond all human aid. Take care of May.—EMIE." He could not understand why the debt had been contracted, as he had no knowledge of it. His wife had not been in the habit of getting things on credit, and he was surprised to see the bill. If she had asked him for the money, he would have given it to her. He paid the rent and taxes of the house and expenditure, and his wife had the management of it. There was no question between them as to money matters, and she was not short of money to his knowledge. The CORONER said that the letter was an appli- cation ior the payment of.£2 16s. 5d., and was addressed to witness. Proceeding, witness said that he bad no knowledge of it. The bill was for some goods— bread. If she had given him the bill, he would have paid it. The application for the debt must have preyed upon his wife's mind. They let apartments, and when he saw his wife on Satur- day she would have the money she received on Friday. He had a certain income every year, and he had never refused to supply the deceased with money. He did not know how she came to Capenhurst. Samuel Fairhurst, coachman, Capenhurst, said that on the Sunday night he was proceed- ing with a carriage to meet his master at the 10.18 train at Capenhurst. When near the station he observed by the light of the carriage lamps a lady sitting down by some railings. He stopped the carriage and went to the lady, who was gasping for breath. He shook her, but could get no answer from her. There was a peculiar smell, and he noticed a bottle con- taining carbolic acid beside her. He went im- mediately to the station, and got some salt and water from the stationmaster, but they could not get her to swallow any of it. He then put the lady in the carriage and took her to a doctor. The latter examined her, and said she was too far gone. Witness believed that the lady was dead. The CORONER, in summing up, said it appeared that the deceased obtained the carbolic acid a short time after she had left her husband. Inquiries had been made by the police as to why she should take the poison, but they had found no motive. The only thing which could account for the act was the letter which had been referred to. It was the usual application of a solicitor for a debt, and not enough in the ordinary course to make a person commit suicide. A good many gentle- men receiving a letter of that kind would take no notice at all of .it, but it appeared to have preyed upon the mind of the deceased. There was no other evidence that could throw any light on the case. The jury found that the deceased had committed suicide in an unsound. state of mind. The CORONER said that Fairhurst had done everything he could for the deceased. The way he acted was most praiseworthy.

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