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THE DEE MUSSEL FISHERY. ■♦

DISTRICT AND PARISH COUNCILS.…

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RAILWAY MYSTERY. ———*———

COUNTY POLICE COURT. ♦

CITY POLICE COURT. «.

MOLD PETTY SESSIONS. ♦-

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DEATH OF MRS. HAY-GORDON.…

PROPOSED COUNTY RIFLE ASSOCIATION…

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A CHESHIRE LANDOWNER A STOWAWAY.…

WHAT 'THE WORLD' SAYS. +

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WHAT 'THE WORLD' SAYS. + The Prince of Wales has gone from Marien- bad to Copenhagen to join the King and Queen of Denmark's family party at Bernstorf Castle, where the Princess and Princess Victoria are staying, while Prince and Princess Charles are the guests of the Crown Prince and Crown Princess at the neighbouring Chateau of Charlottenlund. The eightieth birthday of Queen Louise is to be celebrated to-day. The Duke and Duchess of York will to-morrow conclude their visit to Lord and Lady London- derry at Mount Stewart, when they are to leave Belfast for the Clyde in the Royal yacht Victoria and Albert, which will probably go on from Glasgow to Oban, to embark Princess Beatrice and her children for a week's cruise about the west coast. The Victoria and Albert is to reach the Tail of the Bank at nine on Thursday morning, and she will arrive in the Queen's Dock, Glasgow, at half-past eleven, when she to be moored on the riverside. After the presentation of an address by the Lord Provost, the Duke and Duchess will cross the river in a steamer to the Cessnock Dock, where an address will be presented by the Clyde Trustees. The Duchess of York is to declare the new dock open, and she will name it Prince's Dock. The party will then proceed by steamer to the Broomielaw, and the Duke and Duchess are to drive to the City Chambers, where they will be entertained at luncheon at two o'clock, after which they are to drive to Kelvin Grove, where the Duke will lay the foundation-stone of the new Art Gallery. The Duke and Duchess will leave Glasgow for Dalmeny about five o'clock by special train from Queen-street Station. A highly ornamented gold trowel, a white ivory mallet with gold plate, and a plummet, engraved with the Glasgow arms and the arms of the Duke of York, will be presented to him when he lays the foundation-stone of the new Art Galleries and Museum. I regret to announce the death of Lord Egment, which took place after an illness of some weeks' duration at Cowdray Park, his seat in Sussex, on Sunday night. He was the nephew of his predecessor in the title, and succeeded him in 1874. Lord Egmont never took a pro- minent part in politics, although he was in the House of Commons for a short time before he became a member of the House of Lords. He leaves a widow but no children, his successor in the peerage and estates being his cousin, Mr. Augustus Arthur Perceval. 'Gallant little Wales' is on the point of receiving a first visit from Sir Henry Irving, who has not before played in 'the Principality.' Hence the Cardiff people are making prepara- tions to receive Sir Henry Irving, Miss Ellen Terry, and the other members of the Lyceum company and a public luncheon, addresses of welcome, and other pleasant things are being arranged. It will be &,thousand pities if the Daily Chronicle does not induce the poet of the Purple East to favour it with a sonnet upon the Armenian Patriarch's recent visit to the Great Assassin, to tender him the homage and good wishes of the Armenian nation,' and the Unspeakable One's model reply to the Patriarch's rather fulsome congratulations. There was something little short of sub- lime in the Sultan's assurance of his affection for the Armenian people, and in his demure deprecation of the fact that bad characters are to be found in all countries.' If Abdul Hamid is the criminal lunatic' that he is represented by the victims of acute Turcophobia, it must at least be admitted that there is method in his madness. It would be interesting, by the way, to have his list of the bad characters' in this county by whom he considers his beneficent rule to be hampered. Possibly Sir Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett could furnish it with tolerable accuracy. Notwithstanding the large majorities by which the late Sir George Osborne Morgan held the seat for East Denbighshire, there is reason to believe that a strong local candidate may make at least as good a fight for the Unionists as was made the other day in the case of the 'forlorn hope' at Sheffield. The two contests, indeed, have an important point of resemblance in the fact that in each con- stituency the personality and eminence of the deceased member were in great measure responsible for the big majorities by which the Radicals maintained their hold upon the seat. The plethora of volunteers for the Radical candida- ture suggests the possibility of a split, and has already led to the adoption of the curious expedient of submitting all the names to meetings in the different polling districts, with the understanding that the reports of these local caucuses shall be subsequently considered and adjudicated upon by the Liberal Associa- tion. Presumably the Radicals know their own business best, but this method would seem to be devised with the express object of en- couraging dissension in the choice of a candi- date.

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THE BURGLARY AT WHITCHURCH…

WEEKLY STATE OF THE CHESTER…

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Family Notices

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